Architects borrowed a page from Mother Nature to design this building. Those giant Y-shaped columns holding the office tower resemble tree trunks and branches creating a canopy over us.

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Block by block, a new flavor of Seattle architecture is bursting from the rubble of demolished sites, giving me new opportunities to sketch the changing cityscape. In recent months, I’ve shown you demolition cranes crushing the Rainier Square shopping mall, the restoration underway at Town Hall and a view of the gleaming F5 Tower from Madison Street.

Another important downtown location undergoing a dramatic change is the site of the 2+U development surrounding the historic Diller Hotel building between Second and First avenues and across from the Seattle Art Museum.

We are seeing so many glass towers go up in Seattle these days that it would be easy to dismiss this 38-story highrise as another unattractive, glassy monolith. But the project has a quite a few interesting things going for it.

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Seattle Times news artist Gabriel Campanario has been capturing Seattle's places and people in hand-drawn sketches for more than a decade. To see past columns, visit the Seattle Sketcher home page. Prints, notecards and a book of Campanario’s sketches are available for sale through The Seattle Times store. You may also fill out an illustration request to order a specific image.

Architects at Pickard Chilton, a firm headquartered in Connecticut, borrowed a page from Mother Nature to design this building. Those giant Y-shaped columns holding the office tower resemble tree trunks and branches creating a canopy over us.

The best part of that tree concept is the function it serves. The open space between the Y columns and under the tower will be accessible to the public from every side of the block. Think of it as a mini outdoor mall with shops, restaurants, exhibit spaces and areas for people to sit and relax.

Although the tower is not scheduled to be completed until mid 2019, you can already get a good idea of how things will look. You may also find it amusing to see Hammering Man pounding away just a few feet away from where real pounding is happening.

Here are other sketches from my hard-hat tour of the site: