Early risers can see two planets in the morning sky just about as close to each other as they ever get.

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Don’t feel sad about the dark, wintry days ahead of us. Try instead to see the ray-less mornings as an opportunity to view some stars and planets you might not ordinarily see.

Right now, for example, early risers can see two planets in the morning sky just about as close to each other as they ever get.

Venus, our closest and brightest solar-system sister, will be relatively near Mars all this week, and on Thursday they will be just 0.2 degrees (or two-fifths of a moon-width) away from each other, according to EarthSky.org.

To see them, just look to the east before sunrise, about 7:12 a.m., and use Venus, which will be the brightest object in the sky, to find Mars, which will appear faint comparatively. That’s because right now Mars is about as far from Earth as it gets.

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Next year, however, Mars’ orbit will bring it closer to Earth than it’s been in 14 years.