From ballrooms to bar rooms to social media, our state's neighbor to the north suddenly became a topic of conversation.

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From ballrooms to bar rooms to social media, our state’s neighbor to the north suddenly became a topic of conversation.

At 8 p.m., Marilynn Cooney was sitting on the floor outside the Westin ballroom with her granddaughter Ema Bargeron and a friend.

Her granddaughter had just suggested that they should consider moving to Canada. And she told them that when she was young and Ronald Reagan was elected president, she and her husband also talked about moving to Canada. In the end, they did not, and everything was OK.

Still, she said, “Trump just scares me.” Her biggest worry: That he will be able to select the next Supreme Court justice, and that Roe v. Wade will be overturned. “Who knows what else he’d do,” she said.

Granddaughter Ema said she worries about Trump having access to the nuclear codes, especially in light of the way he has conducted his Twitter feed. She was also concerned what his election would say about American values.

Joanna Bargeron came over and joined her mother and daughter on the floor, rubbing Ema’s back. “They need constant support,” she said, laughing. “It’s going to be OK.”

On social media, despondent Seattleites threatened to head north.

Others noted that the Canadian immigration website was returning error messages.