Bored with the new fall lineup? Tired of the same old nature shows? Tune in today and tomorrow for the first live video broadcast from an...

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Bored with the new fall lineup? Tired of the same old nature shows?

Tune in today and tomorrow for the first live video broadcast from an undersea wonderland off the Washington coast.

Dotted with spires that spew inky plumes of 700-degree water, the Endeavor segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is one of the most active sites on the seafloor. A team of Seattle-based researchers has been studying the area for the past five weeks and will narrate the broadcasts on television and via the Internet.

The broadcast will use high-definition video equipment to capture as much detail as possible about the giant tube worms, undulating mats of microbes and other creatures that thrive in scalding conditions in the undersea volcanic field. Scientists hope to use the same technology as part of an underwater observatory that will wire the seafloor with fiber-optic cables, sensors and cameras.

“One of the hardest things about doing deep-sea science is that these areas are a mile and half below the surface of the water,” said Kristin Ludwig, an oceanography graduate student at the University of Washington, which is coordinating the project called Visions 05. “Any advantage we can get that enables us to see and explore better is a big help.”

The images will be transmitted via satellite. Bad weather could disrupt the broadcasts, Ludwig cautioned.

One-hour, narrated segments are scheduled for 2-3 p.m. today and tomorrow. In the Puget Sound area, the program will be broadcast on UWTV (Channel 27 for Comcast subscribers) and ResearchChannel (Channel 9400 for Dish Network subscribers). Computer users can watch live webcasts by:

• UWTV: www.uwtv.org

• ResearchChannel: www.researchchannel.org/visions05

• National Science Foundation: www.nsf.gov

Live images, without narration, will be broadcast from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 to 6 p.m. on the ResearchChannel, either online or via television.

Sandi Doughton: 206-464-2491 or sdoughton@seattletimes.com