The father of a so-called Dreamer, whose arrest by immigration officials drew a national outcry, has been charged with entering the country illegally in U.S. District Court in Seattle.

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The father of a so-called Dreamer, whose arrest by immigration officials sparked fears of an immigration roundup and drew a national outcry, has been charged with entering the country illegally in U.S. District Court in Seattle.

A complaint filed Tuesday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Brian Tsuchida alleges that Antonio Ramirez-Poledo was deported from the U.S. at Paso del Norte, Texas, in 2004, after a King County conviction for possessing heroin and cocaine for distribution, but then came back.

Ramirez-Poledo appeared Tuesday before Tsuchida, who ordered him detained and scheduled a preliminary hearing for March 14.

Ramirez-Poledo was arrested Feb. 10 outside a home in Des Moines after he was located by an agent from the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Criminal Alien Program. Agents also took his 23-year-old son, Daniel Ramirez-Medina, into custody.

Ramirez-Medina had been brought to the country as a child and had been legally allowed to stay under the Obama administration’s 2012 “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals” (DACA) program, which deferred deportation or other adverse immigration actions against individuals who entered the U.S. illegally as children.

Proponents call its participants “Dreamers,” alluding to their desire to become U.S. citizens.

The arrest was the first involving a DACA-eligible immigrant under the Trump administration, and immigration and civil-rights officials reacted by suing ICE over Ramirez-Medina’s detention.

However, ICE insisted that Ramirez-Medina was a gang member, and he remains in custody. His lawyers have disputed that claim and alleged government misconduct.

The complaint against his father alleges Ramirez-Poledo did a year and a day in jail after his 2004 drug arrest and was then ordered deported. The complaint states that, in addition to the deportation, Ramirez-Poledo had been granted seven “voluntary departures,” including five in 2000, one in 2001 and another in 2006.