One year after a mob breached the U.S. Capitol, temporarily interrupting Congress’ certification of the 2020 presidential election results, more than 700 people have been charged by federal prosecutors. Twelve men who live or lived in Washington at the time of the Capitol attack are among the defendants. Here’s a look at the status of their cases.

Marc A. Bru (United States District Court / )

1. Marc A. Bru, 41

Arrested in Vancouver on March 30, 2021.

Background: Bru, a resident of Vancouver, is a known member of the far-right Proud Boys, according to court records and news reports.

Jan. 6 involvement: Bru is charged with seven offenses, including knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; entering or remaining in the gallery of Congress; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building; civil disorder; and obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting.

What’s next: Pleaded not guilty to all counts. Bru has been released, pending trial.

2. John M. Cameron, 55

Turned himself on Jan. 5, 2022.

Background:  Cameron, a resident of Port Orchard who describes himself on his Facebook page as a “Father, Husband, Real Estate broker (and) Sports Fan,” posted multiple photos and videos of himself before and after the Jan. 6 “Stop the Steal” rally. In one video, taken of himself at a D.C. Metro station following the Capitol siege, Cameron described the events at the Capitol by saying: “Was it pretty? No. Did it make a statement? Yes.”

Jan 6 involvement: Cameron’s charging documents, which were unsealed Thursday — the first anniversary of the Capitol breach – includes four criminal counts: entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

What’s next: Cameron made an initial appearance in federal court on Wednesday afternoon and was released on bond. Cameron plans to plead not guilty to all counts at his next hearing on Jan. 18, his attorney said Thursday.

Jeffrey R. Grace (United States District Court / )

3. Jeffrey R. Grace, 61

Arrested at home in Battle Ground on Jan. 28, 2021.

Background:

Grace, a resident of Battle Ground, Clark County, acknowledged attending the “Stop the Steal” rally on Jan. 6 with his adult son, Jeremy Grace, according to an FBI affidavit. He initially claimed his son did not enter the Capitol with him and he denied being affiliated with any extremist group. An FBI investigation later found both Grace and his son entered the Capitol and that Jeffrey Grace is an active member of the far right Proud Boys, according to court records.

Jan. 6 involvement: Grace faces four misdemeanor counts of entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

What’s next: Grace has pleaded not guilty to all counts and was released pending trial. After he was seen armed and participating in street rallies in Portland and El Paso, Texas, with other Proud Boys last summer, a judge ordered Grace be restricted from possessing “firearms, weapons, or destructive devices” during his release.

4. Jeremy G. Grace, 36

Arrested in Oregon on May 26, 2021.

Background: Jeremy Grace, from Battle Ground, Clark County, attended the so called “Stop the Steal” rally with his father, Jeffrey Grace, who also has been charged related to the Capitol breach. He is alleged to have breached the Capitol with his father and a group of suspected Proud Boys.

Jan. 6 involvement: Jeremy Grace faces four counts of entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol Building.

What’s next: Jeremy Grace has pleaded not guilty to all counts and has been released pending trial.

5. Taylor J. Johnatakis, 37

Turned himself in, following indictment, on Feb. 11, 2021.

Background: Johnatakis, a resident of Kingston, Kitsap County, had long produced his own podcast, “The Peasants Perspective,” during which he has spoken in support of QAnon conspiracy theories and theMAGA revolution but denied being racist or a militia member, according to The Kitsap Sun.

Jan. 6 involvement: Johnatakis faces eight counts, including obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting; assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers; civil disorder; entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds; obstruction, or impeding passage through or within, the grounds of any of the Capitol buildings; engaging in an act of physical violence in the grounds of any of the Capitol building.

What’s next: Johnatakis has pleaded not guilty to all counts and faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted on all offenses. He has been released, pending trial.

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6. Mark J. Leffingwell, 51

Arrested inside the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

Background: Leffingwell, a resident of Seattle’s Wedgwood neighborhood, served in the Washington National Guard from 2005-2009 and deployed with the 81st Brigade to Iraq.

Jan. 6 involvement: Charged with counts of assaulting a federal officer, entering or remaining in a restricted building and disorderly conduct.

What’s next: Leffingwell pleaded guilty last year to one count of assaulting a federal officer under a plea arrangement. He has been released pending his sentencing set for Jan. 10.

7. Ethan M. Nordean, 31

Arrested at home near Auburn on Feb. 3, 2021.

Background: Nordean is a prominent member of the Proud Boys and a former bodybuilder. He is known in right-wing circles by his alias, Rufio Panman. Federal prosecutors contend he was one of the “ringleaders” of the Jan. 6 Capitol breach.

Jan 6. involvement: Charged with conspiracy, obstruction of an official proceeding, aiding and abetting injury to government property; entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; and disorderly conduct in a restricted building or grounds.

What’s next: Nordean is being held at the Federal Detention Center – SeaTac, pending trial. He has pleaded not guilty to all counts, and faces more than 30 years in prison if convicted of all charges.

8. David C. Rhine

Arrested in Gig Harbor on Nov. 11, 2021.

Background: Rhine, a Bremerton resident, was detained inside the Capitol on Jan. 6, and found with two knives and pepper spray, according to court documents. He was released and told to leave the building. Rhine allegedly wrote in a text later: “I witnessed ZERO violence. I saw no ‘Proud Boys.’ Capitol police removed barriers and let people in,” charging papers say.

Jan. 6 involvement: Rhine faces four criminal counts, including entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol Building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

What’s next: Rhine has pleaded not guilty to all counts and has been released pending trial.

Daniel Lyons Scott, a former Arlington man and prominent member of the Proud Boys, has been charged in Washington, D.C., federal court with breaking into the U.S. Capitol during the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection, obstructing Congress and assaulting a federal officer. (FBI  )

9. Daniel L. Scott III, 27

Arrested in Florida on May 20, 2021.

Background: Scott, formerly of Arlington, was among members of the far-right Proud Boys group that marched to the Capitol following Trump’s “Stop the Steal” rally. Known by his nickname, “Milkshake,” Scott allegedly was one of the first insurrectionists to physically confront Capitol police blocking the building, according to charging documents.

Jan. 6 involvement: He faces six federal counts, including knowingly entering and disorderly conduct in any restricted buildings or grounds; knowingly engaging in an act of physical violence in any restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct and act of physical violence on Capitol grounds; obstruction of law enforcement during civil disorder; obstruction of justice or Congress; and assault on a federal officer with physical contact and intent to commit another felony.

What’s next: Scott has pleaded not guilty to all counts and has been released, pending trial.

10. Tyler W. Slaeker, 39

Arrested at home in Federal Way on Aug. 5, 2021.

Background: Slaeker was captured on video walking into and around the Capitol Rotunda, holding what appeared to be a smartphone, according to charging documents. Screenshots later obtained by the FBI appear to pinpoint instances when he took selfies that were later posted on his relatives’ Facebook pages, the charging documents say.

Jan. 6 involvement: Slaeker faces four federal counts, including entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

What’s next: Slaeker has pleaded not guilty to all counts and has been released pending trial.

11. Devlyn D. Thompson, 27

Charged on July 11, 2021.

Background: Thompson, a Seattle resident, admitted he was among a crowd that pushed up against and assaulted officers from the District of Columbia’s Metropolitan Police Department and U.S. Capitol Police who were attempting to stem the tide of protesters forcing their way into the Capitol on the lower west terrace.

Jan. 6 involvement: Thompson pleaded guilty on Aug. 6 to charges of assaulting, resisting or impeding officers while using a dangerous weapon.

What’s next: Thompson was sentenced on Jan. 4 to 36 months in prison and ordered to pay a $2,000 fine. He is being held at the Federal Detention Center – SeaTac.

12. Joseph E. Zlab, 51

Arrested in Everett on May 13, 2021.

Background: Zlab, a resident of Lake Forest Park, runs JMZ Contractors, a construction firm in Everett.

Jan. 6 involvement: Charged in a complaint filed in the District of Columbia with one count of unauthorized entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds, and one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, according to charging documents.

What’s next: Zlab has pleaded not guilty to all counts.He has been released, pending trial. Zlab, whose 52nd birthday is Friday, has a status conference scheduled in his case today, Jan. 6.

Assault on the U.S. Capitol

Feb. 12—Local construction contractor KEU Inc. will be making levee repairs along the Missouri River on Lake Waconda in Cass County, Neb.

The $3.47 million contract with the U.S. Army was announced Feb. 3.

Record floods pounded the Missouri River Basin in 2019, topping levees and devastating communities. Damage estimates for the basin were well into the billions. The cost for damage to levees and flood infrastructure in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Omaha District alone was estimated at $1 billion to $2 billion, according to a report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

KEU repaired 6.3 miles of the Williston Levee Crest Road and 6.7 miles of the Williston Levee Toe Road for the corps’ Omaha District in 2019. The district is responsible for civil works and flood control and coastal emergencies in portions of Iowa and Missouri.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers advertised to a list of prequalified sources of small-business contractors that were vetted to do levee-repair work after the flooding. Out of the nine bids received, KEU was the lowest overall bidder, said Lee McCormick at the corps of engineers. The company is expected to begin work on the project within the next week and will have 180 days to perform the work.

KEU opened in 2003, doing mostly civil and utility work. The company has since expanded into natural disaster cleanup, building and site demolition, levee embankments, and environmental reclamation, according to the KEU website.

It opened a second corporate office in North Dakota in 2011 to work with the oil field companies in the Midwest’s Bakken region. The company’s work with the U.S. Department of Defense began in 2014.