As a new weekly feature, we’re highlighting some of the most interesting or insightful reader comments on articles on our website during the past week. Excerpts have been lightly edited for spelling, grammar and punctuation.

See a comment you think should be included in next week’s roundup? Email assistant metro editor Gina Cole at gcole@seattletimes.com.


Danny Westneat column: The ‘flight shame’ issue comes home to Rick Steves

“Walk the walk before you talk the talk. Meanwhile, I’ll take my staycations, work from home, drive the same 14-year-old four-cylinder for another 14 years, and do my part without yakking about it at work at every opportunity.”

— John Buford (June 7)


‘It was hush money’: College students got settlements that required silence

“Crimes are crimes, no matter who the perpetrator works for. Unfortunately, large organizations want to pretend they are perfect and will fight any suggestion that they, or their employee acting on their behalf, did something wrong.

Doesn’t matter if it’s a large private company or large government institution. They all have Risk Management departments with expert lawyers whose top priority is to protect the organization’s reputation, not to protect the public, not to provide justice to some little no-name who has the gall to think they have rights.

So if something happens to you, don’t bother going through the process they tell you will be fair. And don’t bother to talk to a so-called Ombudsman either — they claim to be fair, but they are there to protect the institution’s interests. The aim of those internal processes is to wear you out, make you feel like you were at least partly at fault and convince you that they are doing you a favor with whatever small recompense they offer.

If you have been victimized, libeled, harassed, find a good, experienced attorney to represent you. They won’t make you feel ashamed, and they will get you a better deal than you could by yourself.

A settlement may not be public justice, but it’s far better than being re-victimized while trying to hold a large organization accountable.

Such settlements may not be good for the taxpayer or shareholder, but if they cared about anything other than money themselves, they would be insisting on better oversight and accountability in the first place.”

— octarine (June 8)


Storm turned high-scoring Alysha Clark into their defensive stopper

“AC is a Seattle fan favorite. She is a pivotal team player, and one can always feel a difference in the game when she’s playing.”

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— suefair (June 9)


After years of complaints, Metro hires a new contractor for its Access paratransit service

“My father uses Access, and it has been so unpredictable, with rides that should take 10 minutes taking hours as they head in the opposite direction and to other towns, winding through back roads. It seems so inefficient. He is elderly, so it’s hard to go that long without a bathroom break; it causes him extreme anxiety. They’ve often been so late that he’s missed doctor appointments. I hope these new contractors are big improvements. Our aging and disabled citizens deserve better.”

— user15485726908502 (June 10)

“I’m disabled and a former Paratransit rider. The complaints raised here are all true and a painful reminder of what I endured. Access is great if you don’t mind being dropped off 45 minutes early to work and then picked up an hour late for your one-hour commute home. I have had too many 12- or 13-hour days because of my Metro Access ride being too early for the morning commute and too late for the evening commute. Lost count of how many times the driver was late and dispatch repeatedly told me the driver was 10 minutes away…and then an hour later, the driver shows up.”

— user15567598843977 (June 10)


Seattle yoga teacher’s ‘Undoing Whiteness’ class: founded on deep purpose, it’s triggered outrage

“Why the outrage and the death threats? Over a yoga class? If it’s not your thing, and you don’t want to attend, don’t attend. Live and let live, or better yet, try to understand why someone felt the need to create such a space.“

— Ramona Quimby (June 10)


At 88, William Shatner is still in the captain’s chair and coming to Seattle

“It’s been sad watching so many from Star Trek (the original series) pass on over the years. I wish they could all stay around forever. Great to see William Shatner is still going strong and is out there living and enjoying life. Hope I can do the same when I am 88.”

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— kwa829  (June 10)


Why Salesforce is shelling out $15.7 billion in stock for Seattle’s Tableau, in one of the NW’s largest acquisitions

“Interesting enough, the CEO supported taxing large businesses (including his) to help fund housing for the homeless in SF. Guess he’ll have a second city to try to support.

‘We are one of the wealthiest cities in the world, with major corporations worth billions of dollars. Shouldn’t the same companies that have helped fuel soaring housing prices be part of the solution?’

If this is legit, and there was indeed some benefit/success…imagine. Would Amazon’s CEO ever say such a thing? (You all know the answer).

Yes, the homeless crisis is complicated, but…our corporations need to have a moral compass.”

— user15236373027693 (June 11)


This couple run a farm share from their Ballard driveway, with plant sales on an honor system

“I subscribe to a CSA (community supported agriculture), and I like it. Not too much packaging: today’s kale just had a twist tie, as did the little white turnips and the garlic scapes; the snow peas came in a small brown paper bag that can go in the compost. The box for my share — every share, actually — is reusable and is flattened and left at the pick-up site so it can be reused next week.

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A CSA won’t replace a grocery store, but supporting local farmers is important, especially given climate change. It is a potluck cooking experience, but I’ve enjoyed it and haven’t felt restricted at all.”

— user851374 (June 11)


Citing possible harm to orcas, Seattle Mayor Durkan protests U.S. Navy training exercises

“How about you do your actual job, which is to protect the people and businesses of Seattle, ensure that laws are enforced, that the roads, sidewalks and other infrastructure are all in good shape and functioning properly, and you actually have some grasp of the concept of stewardship of public resources, including tax dollars, instead of feeding an ever-more-bloated city bureaucracy and catering to your political cronies, special interests and fringey feel-good issues?”

— arthurofrhodes (June 12)


Highway 99 tunnel users won’t have to pay tolls until sometime this fall

“This seems like a reasonable ‘try before you buy’ scenario. I’ve used the old viaduct many times over the decades as an alternate route out of South Seattle heading north, but still haven’t checked out the tunnel yet since it opened. I doubt I’d be a regular user, but it is worth a shot as an option for I-5 north. Of course, the hole in the ground does need to get paid off; a free preview might get more people to use it. One question, though: Are trucks restricted in the tunnel under the same conditions as the I-90 tunnel; e.g., flammable and hazardous loads?”

— meta4 (June 13)


After backlash from cyclists, Seattle tweaks bike-lane plan, but construction will remain limited

“I have children who walk home from school. There is a senior center nearby. We’ve had fatalities in our neighborhood. I’m not a terrible person for wanting safe streets.”

— SeattleUp (June 13)


Seattle’s U.S. Rep. Pramila Jayapal describes her ‘excruciating’ decision to have an abortion

“Maybe the problem is that not enough people are sharing these stories. Otherwise, we would be seeing what’s happening to women’s reproductive health care down south. We are fortunate in the PNW and should use our privileges and insights to help others in less fortunate areas of the country.”

— Reader.ST (June 14)