On Sunday, Project Homeless published an investigation into how one sober-housing company in the Seattle region, Damascus Homes, received tens of thousands of dollars of public funding while red flags surfaced from police, social service agencies and tenants.

Damascus Homes provided sober housing for people on the edge of homelessness., but no governmental body is responsible for overseeing these types of housing. After four years in business, Damascus Homes left some tenants demoralized or homeless, again.

The Seattle Times’ Project Homeless is funded by BECU, The Bernier McCaw Foundation, Campion Foundation, the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, Raikes Foundation, Schultz Family Foundation, Seattle Foundation, Starbucks and the University of Washington. The Seattle Times maintains editorial control over Project Homeless content.

Using the story as a starting place, the author of the investigation, Sydney Brownstone, came together with Edmund Witter, senior managing attorney of the Housing Justice Project at the King County Bar Association, to take a deeper look at problems in housing for people who would otherwise be homeless and talk about the rights tenants have.

The online discussion was held at noon Thursday, March 18.

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Have you had an experience in sober housing, homeless housing or a housing-assistance program that you think The Seattle Times should know about? Call and leave a confidential voicemail at 206-464-2062.

The Seattle Times’ Project Homeless is funded by BECU, The Bernier McCaw Foundation, Campion Foundation, the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, Raikes Foundation, Schultz Family Foundation, Seattle Foundation, Starbucks and the University of Washington. The Seattle Times maintains editorial control over Project Homeless content.