The reaction begs these questions: Can hipster-ness actually be quantified? How do you measure it? We'd love to hear your answers. Get philosophical. 

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We’ve clearly struck a nerve.

We were just the messengers, folks, but when Vancouver, Wash., was named the most hipster destination in America, we had to write about it.

As a result of that story, which included a ranking of 19 other U.S. cities that a British company decided were also hip, we received hundreds of tweets and Facebook comments — mostly filled with utter confusion (and some jabs at Vancouver.)

“If you’re into chain restaurants and strip mall [sic], Vancouver is hip,” one user responded to the story on Twitter.


Many also took issue with cities like Spokane, Tacoma — and even Boise, Idaho — outranking the hipster meccas of Portland and Seattle.

To be fair, though, the ranking only takes into account how fast gentrification is happening in cities, and the per-capita number of “hipster establishments” in a city — microbreweries, vegan stores, tattoo parlors and thrift shops.

So it makes sense that smaller cities would win out in this type of measurement, given that hipster-ness (A.K.A. gentrification) can start in larger cities and bleed out into surrounding areas. Vancouver is just a short drive from Portland.

But the reaction begs these questions: Can hipster-ness actually be quantified? How do you measure it? We’d love to hear your answers. Get philosophical.