With Seattle poised to set a record for the hottest day ever recorded, Public Health — Seattle & King County is providing information about heat-related illnesses:

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With Seattle poised to set a record for the hottest day ever recorded, Public Health — Seattle & King County has some important information about heat-related illnesses.

Infants, the elderly and those doing strenuous activity outdoors are at the highest risk for heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion means a person’s body reaches a temperature of more than 100 degrees.

Heat stroke describes a life-threatening condition when a person’s cooling system stops working and body temperatures reach dangerous temperatures of 105 degrees or higher.

Some medicines, including antihistamines, blood-pressure medications and depression medications can predispose people to heat exhaustion or stroke.

Symptoms of heat exhaustion:

• Can’t keep fluids down.

• Has a headache, weakness, extreme thirst or nausea.

• Has muscle cramps or pains.

• Is sweating profusely.

• Has a temperature of more than 100 degrees.

What to do:

• Cool the person down by having

them sit in the shade.

• Pour cool water over the skin.

• Place a cold, wet towel on the back

of the person’s neck.

• Have the person sip cool water or

Gatorade. (Not too fast, since vomiting

will increase dehydration.)

• If the signs and symptoms do not improve

within an hour, or if they get worse in spite

of your efforts, the person may have heat

stroke. In such cases call 911.

Symptoms of heat stroke:

• Loses consciousness.

• Complains of shortness or breath, chest pain or abdominal pain.

• Is confused, delusional, or has any change in mental status.

• Is unable to drink or is vomiting.

• Has a temperature of more than 104 degrees.

What to do:

• Call 911.

• Have the person rest in a cool shady place.

• Have them sip a sports drink such as

Gatorade or Powerade if they are able.

• Wet their skin with cool water, wet towels,

or sheets. Place ice packs in the armpits,

around the neck, and in the groin.

• Have a fan blowing directly

at the person if possible.

Lindsay Toler: 206-464-2463 or ltoler@seattletimes.com