Tomorrow is one of my favorite days of the year. Halloween can be fun for tiny tots and senior citizens alike. It does not take much time or energy to tell an 8-year-old princess or pirate how pretty or fearsome they are. The beaming smile you receive will be well worth your effort.

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Tomorrow is one of my favorite days of the year. Halloween can be fun for tiny tots and senior citizens alike. It does not take much time or energy to tell an 8-year-old princess or pirate how pretty or fearsome they are. The beaming smile you receive will be well worth your effort.

Halloween precedes the holy observance of All Saints Day on Nov. 1. In ancient days, All Saints Day was known as All Hallows and the day before was All Hallows Eve. Over the years, the name was shortened to Halloween.

It is politically incorrect for a religious leader like myself to like Halloween. But in this instance, I do not care about fitting in with conservative Christian thought. Many Christians believe Halloween is about devil worship and inappropriate for any believer to observe. Some churches have harvest parties for their children in lieu of them going trick-or-treating. Others encourage their youngsters to dress up as biblical characters. I say more power to you if you can find or create a costume of Noah or Mary.

For me Halloween is a secular occasion to decorate, dress up, and find a party to attend. I am one who enjoys decorating for Halloween. Each year I can hardly wait for October so I can assess my supply of orange and purple lights. I am not much into scaring kids in my neighborhood, but I get a kick out of scaring adults with the talking skeleton near my front door.

This year, Halloween has been a pleasant distraction to all the negative political ads. I am grateful my television has a mute button. I do not listen to any of the ads any more. And, all those initiatives have me singing the blues. I find it disheartening that most of the money to fund the initiatives comes from big corporations and lobbyists. Only a tiny fraction has come from ordinary concerned Washingtonians.

I take seriously my civic responsibility to vote and will make informed decisions by Election Day. Yet, many of us longingly await the arrival of Nov. 3, when this year’s season of political bickering will be behind us.

So while I vacillate between voting for or against a state income tax for the wealthy, I distract myself by pondering what candy to hand out tomorrow night. Will it be Snickers, Laffy Taffy, or Skittles?

I know many parents are concerned about the amount of candy acquired and consumed on Halloween. I am a bit bewildered when some children come to my door with plastic pumpkins and pillowcases laden with treats. At some point common sense has to intervene. The supervising adult has to tell the child they have enough, and it is time to call it a night. Even on Halloween, moderation is in order.

When it comes to costumes on Halloween, children should not have all the fun. Creativity rules the day. Treasures can be unearthed when combing through one’s closet with a different eye. An ordinary black shawl can become a mysterious cloak on Oct. 31. A bit of drugstore makeup can make an ordinary neighbor the envy of the block.

If celebrating Halloween is not your thing, it is easy to turn off the porch light. Hopefully, another holiday during the year speaks to you, and delights the child within. Life is serious, hard, and at times discouraging. So on this one night it is a relief to laugh, play, and lighten up, even if only for a few hours.

The Rev. Patricia L. Hunter is an associate in ministry at Mount Zion Baptist Church and an employee-benefits specialist for American Baptist Churches in the USA. Readers may send feedback to faithcolumns@seattletimes.com