They had me at the peanuts. Jimmy Mac's Roadhouse, which recently opened at the Crossings in Federal Way, has three items on its sign: steaks...

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They had me at the peanuts.

Jimmy Mac’s Roadhouse, which recently opened at the Crossings in Federal Way, has three items on its sign: steaks, crab cakes and “peanuts on the floor.” The restaurant is serious about all three.

It has a giant barrel near the front door filled with salted peanuts. Bowls are stashed in a holder above. The floor and the porch area are covered with shells. Throwing the shells on the floor is fun, but those buggers are slippery.

My companion and I were hungry when we arrived about 7 p.m. on a Sunday. We polished off a bowl of peanuts as we waited 45 minutes for a table. Does anyone cook anymore? If you don’t want to wait, call and ask to be put on the wait list.

We didn’t mind the wait for a table, but we took the pager and our bowl of peanuts outside to avoid losing our minds from the loud country music. (No, we don’t like country music. At all. We talked about leaving, actually, but stuck it out.)

Once we were seated, our server came over right away with a basket of sweet yeast rolls, asked if we had any questions about the menu and took our drink orders. She was efficient, funny and helpful.

I ordered a half slab of baby back ribs ($13.95), which came with baked beans, cole slaw and fries (I chose the sweet-potato version). The ribs were tender but not very meaty, and they were a little too smoky for my taste. The generous mound of sweet-potato fries could have been a meal in itself. Between them and the rolls, I had a bazillion carbs. But peanuts are protein, right?

My companion ordered the 12-ounce rib-eye ($18.95), medium rare, with a baked potato and a cup of New England clam chowder instead of a salad. The steak was flavorful but not as tender as he would’ve liked. The potato was huge, and he took at least half home to eat with his leftover steak.

We might go back, if it’s not rude to wear earplugs.

Cindy Zetts: 253-234-8602 or czetts@seattletimes.com