Summer heat and low-water conditions have pushed river and stream temperatures into a danger zone for salmon, according to a study released Monday by the Washington-based Wild Fish Conservancy.

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Summer heat and low-water conditions have pushed river and stream temperatures into a danger zone for salmon, according to a study released Monday by the Washington-based Wild Fish Conservancy.

The study analyzed seven-day average temperatures in 54 salmon and trout-bearing rivers in Washington, Oregon and California, and found widespread conditions that put fish at risk:

• In 98 percent of all stations where temperatures were recorded, conditions were detrimental to spawning.

• In 91 percent of all stations, conditions were detrimental to rearing young fish.

• In 81 percent of all stations, temperatures were high enough to impede adults from migrating upstream.

• In 69 percent of the stations, temperatures had reached levels that could be lethal to most salmon and steelhead trout, according to the study.

Because of the extreme conditions, the Wild Fish Conservancy as well as six other groups sent a paperto the governors of Washington, Oregon, California and NOAA Fisheries requesting emergency measures to close to commercial and recreational fishing in all river reaches where the temperatures exceed 64.4 degrees.

Currently, in Washington, some rivers are closed to salmon fishing because of the drought conditions. Others remain open.

In the weeks ahead more rivers are expected to open as salmon runs build in the region. But state officials have said that there could be more closures ahead because of conditions.