In a neighborhood that had seemingly grown immune to news of violence and death, the fatal shooting of a popular, young music promoter earlier this week apparently has galvanized Seattle's Central District.

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In a neighborhood that had seemingly grown immune to news of violence and death, the fatal shooting of a popular, young music promoter earlier this week apparently has galvanized the community.

The death of Tyrone Love, 26, who was by all accounts one of the good guys, has sparked a rally, two vigils, a benefit concert set for Monday night, and renewed discussion among community leaders about how to reduce violence among youths.

A co-founder of a local music-promotion company named Vibrant Entertainment 206, Love worked during the day at the YMCA where he ran programs for at-risk youth.

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He was devoted to his mother and sisters and volunteered for numerous organizations such as the Community Day School Association near his home in the Central District where he was a mentor, friend and counselor to many.

“I never met a man with the kind of character Tyrone had,” said his friend Danielle Legge, who met him when they were both students at Garfield High School. “His death is pushing people to take a step up and stop what’s going on.”

Love’s death comes on the heels of a series of shootings in the Central District that over the last year have left more than a dozen young men wounded or dead.

According to Robert Stowers of the city’s Parks and Recreation Department, some of the money requested by the mayor for an anti-youth-violence initiative will be earmarked for finding ways to get guns out of young people’s hands.

Mazvita Maraire, the coordinator for Garfield Community Center said, “There’s been a lot of anger, but people are now starting to ask, how can we move forward, where does it start and what can we do.”

The solutions are not apparent yet, but they are being sought in earnest, said Liz Ali, who co-founded Mothers Outreach Movement after her 18-year-old son, Perry Henderson, was fatally shot last year.

Love was shot shortly before 2 a.m. Monday in the 2600 block of East Cherry Street after he and the co-owners of Vibrant Entertainment 206 had thrown a successful Presidents Day party at a nightclub on First Avenue South.

Police have not made an arrest and have asked for the public’s help in finding the newer-model red Dodge Charger or Chrysler 300 that the shooter was described as driving.

“We just can’t understand,” said his brother Chris Epps. “We’re hoping it was mistaken identity.”

Just before his death, Love was involved in putting up anti-violence posters in the neighborhood where he grew up, according to Legge.

“He was very much against violence,” Legge said. “It’s ironic that that was the way he ended up leaving.”

Christine Clarridge: 206-464-8983 or cclarridge@seattletimes.com