City officials hope that settling with the police managers and having them buy into the historic police reforms will be an incentive for the larger Seattle Police Officers’ Guild (SPOG) to settle its contract. The rank-and-file officers have been without a contract since 2014.

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The Seattle City Council on Monday overwhelmingly approved a new contract with the union that represents captains and lieutenants in the Seattle Police Department, in what officials have hailed as a key step in the police-accountability and court-ordered reform process.

The council voted 8 to 1 in favor of the contract, with Councilmember Kshama Sawant dissenting over what she called a lack of transparency in the contract and extra money for managers.

The agreement, reached two weeks ago between the city and the Seattle Police Management Association (SPMA), came after years of failed negotiation. It includes the endorsement of sweeping police reforms and the trial use of body cameras by some supervisors.

The six-year contract is retroactive to January 2014 and will expire at the end of December 2019.

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City officials hope that settling with the police managers and having them buy into the historic police reforms will be an incentive for the larger Seattle Police Officers’ Guild (SPOG) to settle its contract. The rank-and-file officers have been without a contract since 2014.

After years of dickering — including an unfair-labor-practice complaint — the agreement with about 70 captains and lieutenants bolsters the City Council’s wide-ranging police-accountability ordinance enacted in May.

It also moves the department closer to compliance with a 2012 consent-decree negotiated with the U.S. Department of Justice over a finding that officers routinely used excessive force and displayed troubling practices of biased policing.

Under the contract, the managers will receive raises totaling 10.25 percent from 2014 through this year. Next year, the supervisors will receive another raise amounting to 100 percent of the consumer-price-index inflation rate.

As a result, a senior captain’s salary will go from $162,096 at the start of the contract to $179,952 this year. A senior lieutenant would see a salary jump from $136,308 to $150,828.

After the deal was reached, questions were raised about whether arbitration procedures in the contract, used to resolve appeals of terminations and disciplinary actions, undercut the language and aims of the police-accountability ordinance.

But those concerns were allayed when the council received assurances from Councilmembers Lisa Herbold and M. Lorena González that the contract addresses what was seen in the past as cherry-picking of arbitrators.

Councilmembers also were told that appeals will be open to the public, in what had been another issue.

“This is a great agreement that advances our police-reform efforts and offers good financial terms for all parties,” temporary Mayor Tim Burgess said in a statement after the vote. “As part of this historic agreement, the police managers’ union voluntarily chose to embrace Seattle’s new police accountability ordinance. That’s a major achievement that should make us all proud.”

González, who heads the council committee that oversees public safety, said in a statement, “Today, the City Council ratified a collective bargaining agreement with the SPMA that reflects the spirit and intent of our police accountability ordinance that will create long-term, sustainable police reform.”