A 25-year-old Everett man already being held in federal detention for allegedly stealing an assault-style rifle from a torched Seattle patrol vehicle during a Black Lives Matter protest on May 30 was charged Wednesday with second-degree murder and second-degree assault, accused of fatally shooting a man in the back and injuring a teenager in Renton in August, according to King County prosecutors.

Jacob Little is now in custody at the Federal Detention Center in SeaTac, and federal court records indicate his suspected involvement in the shooting death of 25-year-old D’Andre Flynn in Renton was known within days of Little’s Sept. 4 arrest for possession of a stolen firearm in the Seattle case.

King County prosecutors charged Little this week with murder and assault after Renton police obtained additional video footage that showed Little firing at Flynn after the two men — who were strangers to each other — were involved in an argument during a gathering of car enthusiasts in a parking lot on Aug. 30.

One of the rounds Little is accused of firing at Flynn went through the open driver’s window of a BMW, passed through the driver’s headrest, and struck a 15-year-old boy — who was sitting in the back seat — in the shoulder, the charges say.

A third victim suffered five gunshot wounds to his legs, but Renton police have not been able to determine who shot him, according to charging documents. He and the 15-year-old survived their injuries.

The state has asked that a judge impose $2 million bail on the murder and assault charges.

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According to the charges:

More than 200 “car enthusiasts” had gathered in a parking lot in the 500 block of South Grady Way when Renton police responded to a report of a shooting just before 2 a.m. on Aug. 30.

“During the gathering, multiple fights broke out involving numerous people. Witnesses reported seeing multiple people shooting in the air and at least one suspect shooting at a group of people,” a Renton detective wrote in the charges.

Witnesses flagged down arriving officers and showed them a video of a man, who was later identified as Little, firing a rifle out the window of a fleeing Jeep Cherokee, according to the charges. It does not appear those rounds hit anyone.

Seventeen minutes after the initial 911 calls, police received a call from staff at Valley Medical Center, who reported three gunshot victims had arrived at the hospital.

In the aftermath of the shootings, several people sent police videos posted to a variety of social media accounts, the charges say.

One of the videos showed a man, later identified as Little, walking around a Jeep with a handgun in each hand, according to the charges. He was in the company of another armed man. The video also captured footage of Flynn, who was about 20 feet away from Little and his companion; Flynn, too, was armed with a handgun.

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The video showed Little fired the gun in his left hand into the air six times, the charges say. Flynn, who by then was walking away from Little, fired his gun into the air, and then Little’s companion also fired a round into the air.

According to the charges, Little was then seen on the video raising the gun in his right hand and firing twice at Flynn, who was struck in the back by the second round and ran around a car before collapsing on the ground.

An autopsy later determined the bullet passed through Flynn’s aorta, gallbladder and liver before exiting through his chest.

Little’s companion later told police that Little and Flynn had been involved in an argument before Flynn was shot: Flynn had jabbed his gun into Little’s gut and Little pressed a handgun to Flynn’s chest until Little’s companion separated the two.

After Flynn walked away, “Jacob aimed the gun right at the guy and starts shooting,” Little’s companion later told police.

The charges say Renton police also received an anonymous tip from someone who identified Little as the shooter and said Little had recently been arrested for stealing a rifle out of a Seattle police patrol car, a detail Renton police confirmed with their Seattle counterparts.