The Nature Conservancy has purchased 3,184 acres of Rayonier timberlands as part of a broader forest-restoration effort on the Olympic Peninsula.

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The Nature Conservancy has purchased 3,184 acres of Rayonier timberlands in the Hoh River drainage in a $7 million acquisition that is part of a broader forest-restoration effort on the Olympic Peninsula.

The land sale, which closed Monday, will help in the creation of a 32-mile conservation corridor extending from the Olympic National Park to the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary.

The river corridor provides critical habitat for marbled murrelet, northern spotted owl, bald eagle and bull trout, and supports native salmon and steelhead runs, according to a statement released Monday by the Nature Conservancy. Plans for the conservancy land includes planting trees, restoring fish and wildlife habitat and some long-term rotation timber harvests.

“We’re working with local communities to ensure that these wild salmon runs and forests will continue to provide recreation and sustainable livelihoods for generations to come,” said Mike Stevens, state director for the Nature Conservancy.

Rayonier President David Nunes called the sale an “economically viable agreement” that he said will keep the land healthy and in a forest cover.

The land purchase will build on conservation efforts already under way by the Hoh River Trust, which owns 6,800 acres along the Hoh River. The conservancy also has purchased forest lands on the Queets and Clearwater, and is now managing 11,130 forest acres in Jefferson County. The conservancy land is open to public and tribal use for hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities.