Perhaps no one is more aware of the King and Snohomish county border going through Bothell than the managers of Cambria Hills, a new condominium...

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Perhaps no one is more aware of the King and Snohomish county border going through Bothell than the managers of Cambria Hills, a new condominium complex.

The county divide splits the complex so that three of the buildings are located in King County and 13 in Snohomish.

And then there’s one building that’s split down the middle between the two counties so that a home might have a bedroom in one county and a bathroom in the other.

The condos in that building that are divided by the county line haven’t been sold yet, but when they do “it just means we have to do two of everything” when it comes to move-in paperwork, said Sheryl Frisk, development manager for Cambria Hills.

That’s an experience that Ryan Potter, who recently bought a condo there, knows well.

When Potter bought the condo after moving from Florida, he had to sign two sets of paperwork for his title company — one in each county.

“I had a stack of paperwork about 4 or 5 inches tall,” said Potter, who works at AeroJet. “It took me a good hour and a half.”

Other than the initial move-in hassle, though, Potter said living directly on the border between the two counties hasn’t been a problem. It also didn’t influence his decision to buy the 800-square-foot condo in the first place.

“The only other time it’s even come up is when I got my driver’s license,” he said. “For some reason, my address showed up in King County. I just told them I was actually in Snohomish.”

The border hasn’t caused too many problems for Cambria Hills, either, and hasn’t turned potential homeowners away.

“When people buy a home, they are so passionate about a home that they don’t care about those things,” said Frisk.

Kirsten Orsini-Meinhard: 425-745-7804 or kmeinhard@seattletimes.com