PASCO — A rumor that some Columbia Basin College students may be selling seats in high-demand classes to their peers has made its way to the Internet, but college officials say they don't know of any actual instances of the practice.

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PASCO — A rumor that some Columbia Basin College students may be selling seats in high-demand classes to their peers has made its way to the Internet, but college officials say they don’t know of any actual instances of the practice.

If students did sell seats, they could be disciplined for violating the college’s code of student rights and responsibilities, said Frank Murray, CBC spokesman.

The college doesn’t have waiting lists for its classes, so if a student were to sell a seat, the buyer would have to be next to register after the spot opened up.

A posting that mentioned the rumor went up last week on the internet site Craigslist. The poster was looking for a seat in a science class.

Murray said some classes — including certain science classes — are in especially high demand because they’re required for several programs.

And the number of classes offered at the college is going down. Last month CBC announced plans to cut about 100 classes taught by part-time faculty because of the loss of about $1.5 million in state funding.

That budget hit comes on top of $3.4 million in state funding that CBC lost in the 2009 legislative session. The college took steps then such as eliminating fire science day classes and the human services, paralegal and auto body programs to help make up for the reduction.

CBC officials have urged students to register early to ensure they get the classes they need. Murray said that’s happening — more students are signing up for classes as soon as registration begins.

CBC President Rich Cummins said last month that students still will be able to meet all their degree and transfer requirements under the cuts, but they’ll have to be diligent about planning ahead.

“We’re open for business,” he said at the time, “and we’re doing the best we can to ensure we’re serving all the students in the (region).”