Each week, we highlight some of the most interesting or insightful reader comments on recent Seattle Times articles. Excerpts have been lightly edited for spelling, grammar and punctuation.

If you read a comment on seattletimes.com that you think should be included in next week’s roundup, send a link to assistant metro editor Gina Cole at gcole@seattletimes.com.


Nordstrom shoppers look for deals, find memories as Northgate store closes

“Back when malls were all the rage and it seemed a new one opened every week, I hated them, thought they were so consumerist and shallow. On a beautiful day, it was easy to park at a park and go to the beach, but mall parking lots were full. But now that they’re being taken away, it makes me sad and nostalgic. Especially for Northgate. My husband would hang out at Barnes & Noble and enjoy a big mocha frappuccino while I shopped at Macy’s and Nordies. Sometimes we ran into another couple doing the same thing. Those were good times.” — Domesticus (Aug. 10)

“In no way, in a city whose real estate roils with greed vs. need, is hockey ice a good use of city land. Other teams have had the good sense to put their practice areas out of town. If land here is so valuable, perhaps it should be eminent-domained for housing and social services. If we were serious about our housing and homeless crisis, we would not allow developers to build giant vanity projects like this.” — cascadian curmudgeon (Aug. 10)


30 years after the Paddle to Seattle, Tribal Canoe Journeys represent healing and revival

“Thank you for this meaningful piece on the tribal canoe journeys. I would appreciate more articles that explore the relationship between the dominant, colonizer culture and indigenous communities. There is much to learn from — and literally give back to — native culture throughout North America.” — john cathay (Aug. 11)


FYI Guy column: Seattle’s generational divide: Gap between young, old only getting wider

“The fact is, neither Boomers nor Millennials are collectively to blame (or credit) for any of the things that occurred within their generations… Moreover, Millennials are least to blame, given that they’ve only recently started to acquire wealth and political power. But specific individuals, and specific voting decisions, are to blame… not entire generations. That’s lazy thinking for lazy people.” — Josimar (Aug. 12)

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‘Get out of this lane!’ Seattle transit riders wave cars out of bus lane

“I’m just saying that this is a structural problem: a bus lane with no divider and no enforcement. Most people will follow the rules. Some will not. The only way this can be addressed would be on the institutional level (i.e., by the city, either via enforcement or changes to the design of the streets). As an individual, there’s nothing you can do to fix this. In general, getting upset that people are misbehaving doesn’t do anything other than raise your blood pressure. And blocking the lane is counterproductive because it blocks the buses as well.” — M756 (Aug. 13)


Anyone can be an American superhero: Meet the team showing people just that

“First and foremost, it is a wonderful idea to celebrate those who are trying to make this a better place and I commend the author. I don’t, however, think this is a good way to present human heroes to our children. The hyperbole plays more into perception than reality. By definition, a superhero possesses a power that no human can possess and is actually unattainable unless they have some form of tech that makes them mentally/physically superior. I think it would be a better message to our children to present them as heroes who have tapped into some things that all humans are capable of with a vision and courage. I love comic books and the superhero stories as they often employ metaphors for what humans are going through, but we need human solutions and a bigger dose of reality, particularly when everyone seems vulnerable to to perception in the age of social media.” — user15576223106548 (Aug. 13)


Council member wants to stop donors like Amazon from using PACs to influence Seattle elections

“What about union PACs, or was this drafted to apply only to business? Is González getting that big money out of local politics, too?” — Ann in Ballard (Aug. 14)

“GOP tries to prevent poor people from voting, Dems try to prevent people who earned their money from using their money to support the politicians they choose. Tyranny either way.” — WalterWhite (Aug. 14)

“Why should someone have a greater voice than me just because he has more money than me?” — Circumlocution (Aug. 15)


Both orca babies are alive, and all 3 southern resident pods have been spotted in Canadian waters

“There is nothing hopeful about us having pushed the southern residents out of their home, where they have lived for tens of thousands of years. What makes their absence worse are the stories that are getting spun around it. We’ve ceded the Salish Sea to commercial whale-watch operators and the researchers they support. What a tidy story they all tell, absolving themselves of complicity in the whale’s absence. The whales can’t hear when they come home, and now they are staying away. This is not normal, and there is absolutely nothing hopeful about it. Unless it galvanizes the rest of us to say, ‘Enough.'” — user1027605 (Aug. 15)

“When your total population is in the double digits, a net loss of any number is significant and not the direction you want to be headed.” — Kmay127 (Aug. 15)

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After fixing cause of mold infections, Seattle Children’s hospital won’t be dropped from Medicare, Medicaid program

“I find it refreshing that an organization or company can admit fault as clearly as the Children’s administration. The knee-jerk response these days is to never admit fault, presumably to keep the civil suits down. Integrity and commitment to the hospital’s mission trumps denial for being at fault. Kudos.” — prairieman (Aug. 15)

“If Children’s Hospital, as well as University Hospital, were really acting proactively, then they should have monitored their air-filtration systems, rather than waiting until some patients died.” — dtifft (Aug. 15)