The Holocaust Center for Humanity — the first museum dedicated to the Holocaust in the Pacific Northwest — opens Sunday in Seattle.

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Henry and Sandra Friedman Holocaust Center for Humanity Museum — the first museum dedicated to the Holocaust in the Pacific Northwest — opens Sunday in Seattle.

It will share the stories and artifacts of local Holocaust survivors with exhibits that take visitors from prewar Europe to postwar liberation. Visitors will see an exhibit that ties lessons of the Holocaust to contemporary issues and local perspectives, empowering students to speak out against injustice.

The hope is that visitors “will be inspired to take action and make the world a better place. They have the power to make a difference in the world even if it’s just in their everyday life,” says Executive Director Dee Simon.

The center, at 2045 Second Ave., will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, and Jewish survivors of the genocide will be present. Admission is free, though reservations are required through holocaustcenterseattle.org or by calling 206-582-3000.

After that, the center will be open every Wednesday and the first and third Sundays of the month or other times by appointment.

Henry Friedman, for whom the center is named, has told the story for years, of how he and his family hid in the countryside, while the Nazis annihilated his hometown of Brody, Poland. Of the town’s 9,000 to 10,000 Jews, about 100 survived the Holocaust.

A family who had worked in the Friedman family’s textile business, hid his mother, younger brother and a teacher in their barn, which had a room the size of a queen bed. His father hid in another barn a short distance away.

Last year, as plans for the museum were unveiled, Friedman and others talked to The Seattle Times about how they survived and why establishing a local museum mattered.