Seattle's iconic Kingdome was reduced to a dust-choked pile of rubble on March 26, 2000. Did you witness the implosion that day? Or do you have a fond memory of a particular event held in the Kingdome? Tell us about it in the comments.

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Seattle’s iconic Kingdome, the concrete multipurpose arena that dominated the southern end of the city’s skyline, was reduced to a dust-choked pile of rubble on March 26, 2000. People lined up at vantage points a safe distance away that early Sunday morning as the building was brought down in a mere 16.8 seconds.

Here’s a chunk of the Seattle Times story published the next day:

“Wow, wow, wow,” said Stuart Geldholt from his perch on Beacon Hill. “Quick, wasn’t it?”

The Bellingham resident said he came to watch because he never liked the Dome and thought baseball should be played outside.

“This is a dream come true for me,” he said, puffing a cigar. “I’m living out a fantasy watching this thing go.”

Heavy clouds of yellow, white and gray dust billowed out seconds after the first explosions at 8:30 a.m., obscuring the final view of the carefully orchestrated implosion.

Dust choked downtown for nearly 20 minutes, blocking out the sun and leaving a layer of film on cars, streets and storefronts. The dust cloud reached nearly as high as the top of the Bank of America Tower and drifted northwest about 8 miles an hour.

“It was like Mount St. Helens going off, and then all these people just started running,” said Jeff Chabot, a National Barricade employee whose company had cordoned off the streets around the Kingdome. “It was wild.”

The Kingdome stood where CenturyLink Field is today.

Did you witness the implosion that day? Or do you have a fond memory of a particular event held in the Kingdome? Tell us about it in the comments.

 

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