Here is yet another unattributed, undated and unidentified historical photograph with yet very helpful clues, this time two of them.

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Here is yet another unattributed, undated and unidentified historical photograph with yet very helpful clues — this time two of them.

First is the obvious one, the tower of Harborview Medical Center, upper right, which was completed in 1931. We may compare the tower to a fingerprint, for when Jean Sherrard visited Sixth Avenue to find a likely prospect for repeating this view of the tower, he discovered that when he set his camera on Sixth about 20 yards north of Madison Street that the basic forms in his view finder of Harborview tower and the tower in the historical photograph lined up. But it still seemed that he was too far from the tower to, for instance, imagine having a conversation in normal tones with the unnamed historical photographer. Sherrard needed to move south.

The second helpful clue is the sign on the frame building right of center and above the hanging wash. It reads: “Admiral Transfer Company — Day — Night — Holiday Service.” The address for Clyde Witherspoon’s Admiral Transfer in 1938 is 622 Columbia St., which puts it at the northwest corner with Seventh Avenue and Columbia.

Now we may move to the alley a half block south of Marion Street, between Sixth and Seventh avenues. If he could have made it there he would have been suspended 60 feet or so above the center of the Interstate 5 ditch. Instead, for his second look to the tower he stood on the Madison Street overpass.

The houses on the left are in the 800 block on Seventh Avenue.

And whose white wash is this? In the 1938 city directory the laundryman Charles Cham is listed at 813 Seventh Ave.

“Washington Then and Now,” by Paul Dorpat and Jean Sherrard, can be purchased through www.washingtonthenandnow.com ($45) or through Tartu Publications at P.O. Box 85208, Seattle, WA 98145.