When Walter Smith and Mary-Alice Pomputius completed the top-to-bottom renovation of their Leschi bungalow during 1998-1999, it seemed that nothing could sway them from moving. They had turned it from a wreck to an Arts and Crafts showplace.

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When Walter Smith and Mary-Alice Pomputius completed the top-to-bottom renovation of their Leschi bungalow during 1998-1999, it seemed that nothing could sway them from moving. They had turned it from a wreck to an Arts and Crafts showplace.

What was missing once they’d finished, it seemed, was the challenge and reward they’d experienced in transforming the house into a home. They have found it again in a Capitol Hill house, and their learning curve on the first project has paid off mightily on this one.

Built in 1908 by the well-known local architect Arthur L. Loveless, in collaboration with Clayton D. Wilson, it’s a Tudor Revival gem that shows Loveless’ comfort with both Tudor architectural elements and their adaptation for an urban location.

In this case, his clients were William Bloch Sr., owner of the Germania Café at the corner of Second Avenue and Seneca Street, and his wife, Minnie. Bloch was born in Germany and came to Seattle in 1889. The most obvious references to his German roots and his appreciation of good times are the two German inscriptions in the billiards room or rathskeller, recently uncovered by the present owners: “Life’s sunshine is drinking, loving and frolicking” and “The wrinkles on the brow float away when the wine rises to the brain.”

The main floor contains most of the public spaces, including a great hall, living room, study, dining room and breakfast room (now a media room). But entertainment was to be found in the third-floor ballroom and the basement billiards room with its generous cooled storage room for wine and beer.

Smith and Pomputius are the sixth family to live in the house. Over the past two years, they have extensively restored and renovated the building. With help from a cadre of skilled workers, they have seen to replumbing and rewiring nearly the entire house; relocating and replacing period-inappropriate light fixtures; dividing the house into four heating zones (rather than one); rebuilding or replacing many of the 150 single-paned, leaded-glass windows; rebuilding or replacing several outside doors; replastering walls and ceilings; restoring original tinted and scored concrete floors; renovating the basement bathroom; repainting and wallpapering; and replacing the roof.

They have also converted all five fireplaces to gas and restored murals in the dining room. The ballroom and the breakfast room have been imaginatively converted into a library and a media room. Finally, the masonry on all sides of the house had suffered weather damage, so the east porch and the chimney wall on the south side have been repointed, and the arches over the kitchen door and the west porch have been rebuilt. More work continues.

In a 1963 Seattle Times article about the house, fourth owner Anna Majors said the house is “big but homey” and “much easier to keep up than a small one.” Smith and Pomputius agree that the house is homey. But easy to keep up? Not so much.

Lawrence Kreisman is program director of Historic Seattle and author of “The Arts and Crafts movement in the Pacific Northwest.” Benjamin Benschneider is a Pacific Northwest magazine staff photographer.