Debuting this week, ‘Gather’ looks at our path to camaraderie, acceptance, belonging — and the realization that we’re not really as alone as we might think.

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WE’RE DEBUTING another new feature this week. It’s called “Gather,” and it will explore our path to camaraderie, acceptance, belonging — and the realization that we’re not really as alone as we might think.

Gather will appear every other week, alternating with “Cheers!” — our take on drinks and drinking that debuted last week.

Gather guru Christy Karras, an insightful and gifted writer who specializes in “the offbeat,” moved to Seattle from Salt Lake City and found “her people” in a romance writers’ group, at dance classes and playing pub trivia.

If her name sounds familiar, it could be because Christy’s work already appears in The Seattle Times, on everything from the Seattle Opera to birding in the Tri-Cities.

Now she’s going to introduce us to people who are connecting through hobbies, interests, adventures — whatever it is that brings us together socially — in stories about our increasingly diverse community, and the ties that bind us. It might be old friends getting together every week for book club, or singles meeting up to go on a hike, or onetime strangers who practice speaking Turkish together: shared experiences of people celebrating a true sense of community.

Christy would love to hear from you — and meet you and “your people.” Just let her know where and when and why you gather.

Gather will replace Nicole Tsong’s “Fit For Life” feature, though Nicole still will write the cover story for our annual Health and Fitness Issue this spring.

Here’s a Gather sampler, from Christy’s debut:

“I frequently join different groups of trivia-lovers to test wits against similarly nerdy Seattleites. It turns out that, perhaps not surprisingly, Seattle is a nerd-rich environment. And these are definitely my people.

“I’m just one of many, newcomers and old-timers alike, facing the same question: How do you make friends in a city renowned for its standoffishness, and in a world that encourages division and isolation?”