Finding the contemporary prospect for this ca. 1913 look over Green Lake from Phinney Ridge was, of course, not particularly difficult. Taking the "now" photo was.

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Finding the contemporary prospect for this ca. 1913 look over Green Lake from Phinney Ridge was, of course, not particularly difficult. Taking the “now” photo was. To avoid the sightline inhibitions of nearly a century of vigorous growth, Jean Sherrard moved away from the trees and onto the sidewalk. Mounting his camera on a 10-foot pole and lifting his arms high, he took a repeat that looks east on North 63rd Street to its intersection with Fremont Avenue.

Since the neighborhood in 1913 had many vacant lots, it is possible to take the old postcard in hand, explore the contemporary neighborhood and find a few homes still intact. Most are, however, either hard or impossible to find in the “now” scene because of trees and newer residences getting in the way.

One small example is the white residence with the dark shingle roof that appears just to the right of the power pole in the center of the frame at the bottom. Only the top of its snow-defined roof can be seen in Sherrard’s “now.” The rest is hidden behind the newer bungalow on the northeast corner of North 63rd and Fremont. The brilliance of the little home at 706 N. 63rd St. is deceptive. It is only 20 feet wide and about twice as long. According to the tax records, it was built in 1907. And to my way of thinking, this snug, barn-shaped home is wonderfully charming.

In 1911 the Park Department lowered Green Lake 7 feet, thereby adding 100 acres to develop our encircling park with well-pounded paths. Note the exposed trolley trestle that crosses much of the scene near the shore. Since 1911 it is high and dry.

“Washington Then and Now,” by Paul Dorpat and Jean Sherrard, can be purchased through www.washingtonthenandnow.com ($45) or through Tartu Publications at P.O. Box 85208, Seattle, WA 98145.