Catching up: Danny Newcomb has enjoyed playing live and soon will release the Sugarmakers’ second record.

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Original magazine story: Jan. 31, 2016

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President Obama shakes hands with a small child after arriving at SeaTac on Friday afternoon on Air Force One. June 24th, 2016. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)
President Obama shakes hands with a small child after arriving at SeaTac on Friday afternoon on Air Force One. June 24th, 2016. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

When Danny Newcomb jumped back into the music business, he didn’t know what to expect.

“More happened than I thought would,” says Newcomb, who has been playing all over the Northwest and working on a second record with his band, the Sugarmakers.

Newcomb, 50, grew up in Laurelhurst and began chasing his rock ’n’ roll dreams with middle-school pal Mike McCready, then later in the popular band Goodness in the 1990s. After Goodness broke up, Newcomb eventually moved to Vashon Island. He and his wife, Andrea Braganza, have three kids, a bunch of animals and plenty to do on their farm.

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Two years ago, Newcomb decided to give music another try. He wrote all the songs; sang them; and played lead guitar on the Sugarmakers’ first record, “Masterwish,” a 12-song collection of pop-rock gems. He played festivals, clubs, wineries, block parties, local radio and TV shows, record stores and Seattle Living Room shows.

Newcomb says he’ll release a single, “King of Nothing,” on McCready’s HockeyTalkter label. McCready plays guitar on the song, and some of the others that will end up on the full Sugarmakers record. Newcomb says he has 16 songs done and has just started mixing with Seattle recording wizard John Goodmanson.

“It’s making me bananas,” Newcomb says of trying to find the best 11 for the record.

This record will be “a little more vocally driven,” he says. “It’s also a little more rockin’. And just a touch darker.”

Then there will be more live shows and a possible vinyl release of Goodness’ first record, and a reunion show.

And there’s still life on Vashon, where Newcomb built a new house the family moved into a little more than a year ago.

“We got through another soccer season,” Newcomb says. “The sheep keep multiplying, though.”