In this September harvest issue, our environmental magazine Footprint is taking a seat at the table and dishing on everything farm to fork — from fair trade to ways to get your fresh on.

Share story

“I always say a gastronome who isn’t an environmentalist is just stupid, and I say an environmentalist who isn’t a gastronome is just sad.”

— Carlo Petrini, founder of the Slow Food movement, quoted in The New York Times

What should be more basic than food, glorious food — clean, affordable, nutritious, delicious — yet these days, what’s more maddeningly complicated?

Food is sustenance, food is pleasure, food is … a politically fraught environmental issue.

We’re rethinking what we eat, how to grow it, where to buy it, what to pay for it, how to pay for it — in an explosion of books, Web sites, blogs, movies, from every angle, from food porn to food politics. This is especially true in the Northwest, an epicenter of conscious eating and devotion to our natural bounty of local foods.

And that’s a good thing. Ultimately, as our cover story says, we’re on our way home again to “local food that isn’t sprayed, injected, modified, adulterated and trans-fatted into inedibility.”

In this September harvest issue, Footprint’s taking a seat at the table and dishing on everything farm to fork — from fair trade to ways to get your fresh on.

Please share

We’d love to hear how you think we’re doing, stories and people we should know about, comments you’d like to share with other readers. Send to: footprint@seattletimes.com

Staff

Pacific Northwest magazine editor: Kathy Andrisevic

Footprint editor: Carey Quan Gelernter

Associate Pacific editor: Kathleen Triesch Saul

Art director: Carol Nakagawa

Desk editor: Marilyn Bailey

Online producer: Matt Ironside and Nate Robinson