Food, innovation and resilience in the face of climate change

When Nick Pate opens the gate to the large grass field at his Raising Cane Ranch in Snohomish, the herd of  Scottish Highland cattle comes calling. Cinnamon, right, is the matriarch. Those without names don’t get to stick around. Pate says grass-fed cattle are leaner, don’t smell bad and have a higher level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. (Alan Berner/The Seattle Times)
When Nick Pate opens the gate to the large grass field at his Raising Cane Ranch in Snohomish, the herd of female Scottish Highland cattle comes calling. Cinnamon, right, is the matriarch. Those without names don't get to stick around. Pate says grass-fed cattle are leaner, don't smell bad and have a higher level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. (Alan Berner/The Seattle Times)

Washington food and wine producers are used to natural weather variations, but things are growing less predictable.