‘The Salmon Sisters’ share how growing up on a remote Alaskan homestead shaped their perspectives

Sisters Claire Neaton, left, and Emma Teal Laukitis grew up on a remote homestead in Alaska. They have written about their lives in their new book, “The Salmon Sisters: Feasting, Fishing, and Living in Alaska.” (Camrin Dengel / Courtesy Sasquatch Books)
Sisters Claire Neaton, left, and Emma Teal Laukitis grew up on a remote homestead in Alaska. They have written about their lives in their new book, "The Salmon Sisters: Feasting, Fishing, and Living in Alaska." (Camrin Dengel / Courtesy Sasquatch Books)

Sisters Emma Teal Laukitis and Claire Neaton discuss how growing up on a remote Alaskan homestead shaped a simple, respectful approach to nature, life and wild ingredients 

Pacific NW Magazine

Seattle arose from a tortuously transformed Duwamish River

WHEN WE THINK of waters that define Seattle, which ones come to mind? Puget Sound and Elliott Bay, with Lake Washington and Lake Union close behind. Perhaps Green Lake. Don’t forget the Lake Washington Ship Canal. But what about the seemingly invisible Duwamish River, harnessed (some say ravaged) beyond original recognition and poisoned beyond palatability? Shouldn’t...

READER’S LENS – ONE TIME USE ONLY
								
Gloria Z. Nagler
gloria@naglerlaw.com
Lake Forest Park, WA
206 954 4112
Lake Forest Park at Animal Acres park
2020/05/28

“Courageous Jumping Spider confronting nosy photog! We have 86 species of jumping spiders in our area. so named because they pounce on prey rather than trap prey in webs. Their two central eyes are identifiers, though they have eight eyes in total. Used my Olympus M1X with 60mm macro lens, ISO 2,000, f/4 at 1/400.”

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14:44:15 30 May, 2020
Pacific NW Magazine

Reader’s Lens: Looking into (some of) the eyes of a jumping spider

Photographer: Gloria Z. Nagler Photo taken: May 28, 2020, in Lake Forest Park Photographer’s description: “Courageous Jumping Spider confronting nosy photog! We have 86 species of jumping spiders in our area, so named because they pounce on prey rather than trap prey in webs. Their two central eyes are identifiers, though they have eight eyes...