Liquor flows and blood spills in ‘Seattle Prohibition: Bootleggers, Rumrunners & Graft in the Queen City’

Seattle’s “Gentleman Bootlegger,” Roy Olmstead, and his second wife, Elsie, in 1925. They were both charged with violating the National Prohibition Act. Elsie was acquitted, but Roy was convicted in 1927 and sentenced to four years at McNeil Island. He got out in 1931; the couple divorced in 1943. (MOHAI, Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection)
Seattle’s “Gentleman Bootlegger,” Roy Olmstead, and his second wife, Elsie, in 1925. They were both charged with violating the National Prohibition Act. Elsie was acquitted, but Roy was convicted in 1927 and sentenced to four years at McNeil Island. He got out in 1931; the couple divorced in 1943. (MOHAI, Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection)

Fired from the Seattle Police Department, Roy Olmstead found fame and fortune peddling booze during Prohibition.

Fit for Life

Workplace wellness programs barely move the needle, study finds

Workplace wellness programs — efforts to get workers to lose weight, eat better, stress less and sleep more — are an $8 billion industry in the U.S. Most large employers offer some type of wellness program — with growth fueled by incentives in the federal Affordable Care Act. But no one has been sure they...