How Seattle pulled together 50 years ago to preserve Pike Place Market — and the soul of the city

Seattle City Council members Sam Smith, left, and Phyllis Lamphere, right, flank Victor Steinbrueck during an April 1971 march in front of Seattle’s City Hall. Most in the crowd of approximately 100 were protesting the city’s Pike Plaza urban-renewal plan, including Steinbrueck, an architect and University of Washington professor who was the leader of the Friends of the Market group. Lamphere supported the Pike Plaza plan. (Greg Gilbert / The Seattle Times, 1971)
Seattle City Council members Sam Smith, left, and Phyllis Lamphere, right, flank Victor Steinbrueck during an April 1971 march in front of Seattle's City Hall. Most in the crowd of approximately 100 were protesting the city's Pike Plaza urban-renewal plan, including Steinbrueck, an architect and University of Washington professor who was the leader of the Friends of the Market group. Lamphere supported the Pike Plaza plan. (Greg Gilbert / The Seattle Times, 1971)

In an earlier era, Seattle might not have housed a critical mass of supporters for Pike Place Market. The Market was built on working-class and agriculture values, while its champions were largely professionals with more education and privilege.