After 12 years of more talk than action, work on Bellingham’s central waterfront is finally underway

The iconic “Acid Ball,” a remnant of an old Georgia-Pacific pulp operation, glows in the twilight at Bellingham’s new Waypoint Park, along Whatcom Creek Waterway, with dormitory buildings at Western Washington University visible on the hillside behind it. The two terra-cotta-clad cylindrical towers, at left, are pulp-storage towers, which were built to store bleached and unbleached pulp. The waterway was recently decontaminated by the Port of Bellingham in a $32 million cleanup phase that removed 110,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment. Cleanup work in other areas of the waterfront-renovation project, which ultimately will span nearly 240 acres, remains underway. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)
The iconic “Acid Ball,” a remnant of an old Georgia-Pacific pulp operation, glows in the twilight at Bellingham’s new Waypoint Park, along Whatcom Creek Waterway, with dormitory buildings at Western Washington University visible on the hillside behind it. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

Most of the redevelopment work is still in the works, but even now, residents actually can access Bellingham Bay.