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After watching New York Times columnist Michelle Goldberg interrupt Bill Maher’s closing monologue on “Real Time With Bill Maher” Sept. 7, in which Maher said that former U.S. Sen. Al Franken shouldn’t be permanently banished from politics, I read her column with renewed interest.

Why? It brings up the issue of due process, which Al Franken did not get.

With the recent allegations made by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, I believe that Ford and Kavanaugh should get due process under the law, in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee, in open court under oath [“Is Kavanaugh nomination at risk?,” Sept. 17, A1].

I hope that all victims of the #MeToo movement will be watching, and that the questions and concerns raised in Goldberg’s column will be addressed.

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If this isn’t an #MeToo moment, I don’t know what is.

Marsha Conn, Seattle

An earlier version of this letter, posted Sept. 18, incorrectly edited in Franken instead of Ford in this paragraph: “With the recent allegations made by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, I believe that Franken and Kavanaugh should get due process under the law, in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee, in open court under oath.”