There’s draining the swamp, there’s disrupting the status quo, and then there’s simply being lazy and perverse. The last characterizes Trump’s approach to government.

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It’s hard to argue that any one Cabinet member or nominee tells the Donald Trump story better than another, but I’m tempted to say exactly that about Ronny Jackson, the president’s hasty, irresponsible and — the way things are looking now — doomed choice to lead the Veterans Affairs Department.

Granted, Jackson doesn’t embody the administration’s venality. The crown for that goes to Scott Pruitt, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, and it glitters with discounted jewels from lobbyists and businesspeople with no agenda — none! — beyond tribute to such a distinguished public servant.

Jackson’s selection tidily reflects many of Trump’s most distinctive traits and disturbing tropisms: his obsession with looks; his disregard for relevant experience; his indulgence of decisions that make him feel good in the instant, consequences be damned; and above all, his itch to marinate in as much flattery as possible.

Remember the news conference last January when Jackson applied the marinade? Nine times he trotted out “excellent” to describe various aspects of Trump’s health. When “excellent” needed a breather, “incredible” subbed, as in, “He has incredible genes.”

“It’s just the way God made him,” Jackson volunteered, divining clearer evidence of divine munificence in Trump than some 60 percent of the American public does. We should have recognized Jackson’s obsequious aria for what it was: an audition for a promotion.

Trump heard the siren’s song, and last month, when he fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, he announced his intention to put Jackson in the job. But that resolve wavered on Tuesday, following reports that members of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee were investigating claims that Jackson drank and allowed the overprescribing of drugs.

What an unnecessary but characteristic mess. From the start Trump’s pick of Jackson befuddled lawmakers, who observed that Jackson would, with limited managerial experience, be expected to run a federal agency with 360,000 employees and a $186 billion annual budget.

The president obviously did no meaningful vetting of Jackson. And thus he demonstrated anew the discernment that was surely on Republican strategist Steve Schmidt’s mind when he recently offered this assessment on MSNBC:

“From a personnel perspective, we’ve never quite seen the assemblage of crooks, just outright weirdos, wife beaters, drunk drivers, complete and total incompetents that’s been assembled.”

There’s draining the swamp, there’s disrupting the status quo, and then there’s simply being lazy and perverse. The last characterizes Trump’s approach to government.

So when Jackson, dressed in his uniform as a Navy rear admiral, cast Trump as some pulchritudinous Captain America, the president had all the validation that he could ever want, and all the motivation that he would ever need to lift Jackson up.

Pity that all that fawning may go to waste.