Voters in Seattle should re-elect Councilmember Tim Burgess for City Council Position No. 8.

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THE variety of candidates running for Seattle’s rearranged City Council is refreshing and shows how passionate residents are about the city’s challenges and opportunities.

That enthusiasm shines in the race for citywide at-large Position No. 8, which includes a rock musician, a longshoreman, a tenants’ advocate and a former Seattle police officer as candidates.

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Tim Burgess

Tim Burgess

Seattle City Council Position 8

Strengths: Relatively moderate and pragmatic; has shown impressive leadership

The clear choice in this race is the incumbent, Councilmember Tim Burgess, a former police officer who later founded a communications consulting firm. Burgess stands out, especially for his ongoing work on police reform, and Seattle would benefit if he stays on the case. ... "

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These new voices are welcome in a political arena that’s too often suffocated by conformity, political correctness and kowtowing to special interests.

Yet the clear choice in this race is the incumbent, Councilmember Tim Burgess, a former police officer who later founded a communications consulting firm. Since he was first elected in 2007, Burgess has demonstrated effectiveness and leadership, especially in his work to overhaul the Seattle Police Department.

Burgess is relatively moderate and pragmatic. He has shown impressive leadership in advocating for the Seattle Preschool Program to give the city’s youngest residents a better start at school and life. Last fall, voters agreed to tax themselves to pay for the program, which rolls out in September. He also has advocated for progressive social programs such as the Nurse-Family Partnership that provides nursing visits to first-time, low-income mothers.

In his next term, Burgess should sharpen his focus on Seattle’s spending and over-dependence on levies. With much of the city upset about growth and stifling traffic, he should also look more critically at proposals from the mayor’s office, such as the Move Seattle plan.

It’s tempting for Seattle voters to hit refresh — or the flush lever — at election time, but in this case continuity is a good thing. Burgess stands out, especially for his ongoing work on police reform, and Seattle would benefit if he stays on the case.