Share story

The Port of Seattle is at a turning point that requires leaders who can restore trust in this critical institution and continue producing jobs and economic growth.

The Times recommends:


John Creighton

CANDIDATE

Port of Seattle Commission, Position 1

Strengths: Creighton, a lawyer who has served since 2006, is this race’s candidate most committed to defending the port and Seattle’s maritime and industrial zones — and the jobs they support — from encroaching development.

His experience, including leadership developing the port’s growth plan and his understanding of the realities of the port’s competitive challenges, makes him the superior choice."

Read all editorial recommendations —>

Among numerous strong candidates running for three port commission seats, voters should elect incumbents John Creighton in Position 1 and Stephanie Bowman in Position 3, and newcomer Peter Steinbrueck in Position 4.

Their range of experience and expertise will best help the port as it expands Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and faces stiffer competition for shipping business, particularly from terminals in British Columbia. They should also help the port improve internal challenges around accountability and transparency and help hire a new executive director. The previous director, Ted Fick, abruptly left in February amid controversy around poorly implemented bonuses and payroll changes.

Creighton, a lawyer who has served since 2006, is this race’s candidate most committed to defending the port and Seattle’s maritime and industrial zones — and the jobs they support — from encroaching development.

Most Read Stories

Unlimited Digital Access. $1 for 4 weeks

These zones are rare and precious. They provide opportunity for laborers without college degrees to earn enough to support families and buy homes. Located next to a deep-water port adjacent to rail service and highways, these lands and port facilities are irreplaceable.

Creighton should strive to make the commission more transparent and sharpen its oversight of staff. But his experience, including leadership developing the port’s growth plan and his understanding of the realities of the port’s competitive challenges, makes him the superior choice.