Bruce Harrell is the best candidate to represent Seattle's eclectic City Council District No. 2.

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SEATTLE City Council District No. 2 is the city’s most diverse, encompassing a fascinating cross-section of people, nonprofits and industries. From Chinatown-International District to Beacon Hill, Rainier Valley, Seward Park, Columbia City and Sodo — the voters of this district need strong, effective representation.

The district is home to some of the most affluent and impoverished residents in the city — and is a center of manufacturing jobs. Displacement is a huge concern as the city continues to attract new high-wage employees and once-affordable neighborhoods become gentrified.

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Bruce Harrell

Bruce Harrell

Seattle City Council District 2

Strengths: Strong voice on police reforms; understands social-justice issues

Room for improvement: Should start by becoming a stronger advocate for the Port of Seattle.

Harrell’s strength is his understanding of social-justice issues and how systemic racism often hinders progress and opportunities for many in a district with high concentrations of working-class, and often foreign-born, Asian, black and Latino residents. ..."

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Out of the three candidates running, Bruce Harrell is the most qualified and able to deal with the district’s concerns.

A seven-year council member and longtime district resident, Harrell currently serves as chair of the Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology Committee. He has been a strong voice on police reforms and pushed early for body cameras on police officers.

Trained as an attorney and informed by his black and Japanese heritage, he is running again to build “pathways to success” and bring investments to a community that has traditionally lagged behind others.

Harrell should start by becoming a stronger advocate for the Port of Seattle, the maritime industry and Sodo businesses, and their importance to middle-class families. These are major employers impacted by the city’s ideological fight against Shell’s short-term lease at Terminal 5, as well as an ill-advised effort to build a sports arena.

Harrell’s strength is his understanding of social-justice issues and how systemic racism often hinders progress and opportunities for many in a district with high concentrations of working-class, and often foreign-born, Asian, black and Latino residents.

The two challengers in this race are informed on some issues, but they lack Harrell’s experience and failed to make a case to unseat him.