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With the state Supreme Court demanding Washington fix the way it pays for public schools, lawmakers have produced a complex, and confusing, school-financing system.

Many voters, especially in the Puget Sound region, will be paying higher state-property taxes, starting this year, but the uncertainty of the rollout has some school districts asking voters for extra help through the transition.

What is still unclear is how the reforms will affect the quality of each child’s education and whether the state is now amply paying for an equitable education for all students.

This is not an academic exercise. Voters are evaluating local school-levy requests on the Feb. 13 ballot in 24 King and Snohomish County districts. The editorial board surveyed them all about their intentions.

The Legislature decided that, as of 2019, local school levies will be for “enrichment” only. That is, for expenses not included in basic education, such as athletics and extracurricular activities. But school officials say they’re still waiting for the state to clearly define what qualifies as enrichment and for the Legislature to fully pay the cost of basic education, as ordered by the Supreme Court.

The 2012 McCleary ruling came down hard on the state’s long-standing practice of relying on locally raised taxes to pay for basic education, which is the state’s paramount duty, according to the constitution.

Complicating voters’ decisions is that they will not have seen their state property-tax bill before they vote. In many districts, those rates are much higher than previously. The intention is that the state levy goes up while local levies go down. Property-tax bills will be available online and in the mail around Feb. 14 in Snohomish County and Feb. 16 in King County.

In the two counties, only the Stanwood-Camano School District in Snohomish County is not asking voters for local money to support basic education services like special education. Stanwood is running a levy only for building repairs and other capital projects. Bellevue comes close to not asking for basic-ed money, but even that wealthy district needs some levy dollars to pay the special-education costs not covered by the state.

The survey questions are intended to help readers understand how districts are handling the new, uncertain world. Answers from some districts are published below, and the full list can be found online.

Lawmakers have the power to improve this situation by ensuring the McCleary plan amply funds districts to cover basic education

Until then, voters find themselves in a difficult position. If the Legislature could prove it has given schools enough money to ensure every child gets a great education, no matter their ZIP code, local levies would be just for enrichment and voters could decide whether they think their schools need new band uniforms or a piano.

Voters now will have to evaluate these levy requests with the limited information available.

No matter how they vote, they should keep a close eye on both the Legislature and their local school district to make sure money is being spent well to help every kid succeed.

Click on your district:

Bellevue | Darrington | Edmonds | Enumclaw | Everett | Federal Way | Highline | Index | Issaquah | Kent | Lake Washington | Marysville | Mercer Island | Monroe | Mukilteo | Northshore | Riverview | Shoreline | Snohomish | Snoqualmie Valley | Stanwood | Sultan | Tahoma | Vashon Island

Bellevue

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $2.80 in 2019, $2.54 in 2022
  • Old levy rate: $2.93
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Special ed, gifted, seventh period at middle schools and high schools, music and arts, languages in middle school, technology, after-school sports. Plus one-year school-bus levy in 2019.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: Without further clarity from the Legislature, we are unable to provide you with a specific breakdown
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? No, but levy designed to decrease over the four years.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? We will only collect what is needed to provide the quality education programs expected by our community.
  • Revenue: $51 million

Darrington

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $3.58
  • Old levy rate: $3.83
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Educational programming and day-to-day operations not fully funded by state
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: In 2019, all levy revenue will be used for enhancements.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? Yes, If $1.50 per $1,000 valuation maximum is retained by state, our levy will be rolled back by about $580,000.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? Rollback will depend on state decision, changes to HB 2242 in this year’s legislative session.
  • Revenue: $1 million

Edmonds

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.50
  • Old levy rate: $2.37
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? More teachers for smaller classes, para-educators, security, to make up for shortfalls in special ed, technology, curriculum, staff pay and benefits.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: An analysis from OSPI for the 2015-16 school year found 91 percent of the district’s levy collection went to support basic education. It is difficult to determine how that percentage will change until the district has had more time to work with the new funding model.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? They plan to follow the statutory limit on how much districts can collect in their local levies, or $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed valuation.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? All levy dollars going forward will be used for enrichment purposes, according to definitions in HB 2242.
  • Revenue: $49 million in 2019, $78.5 million in 2022

Enumclaw

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.50
  • Old levy rate: $3.89
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Security, special education, early learning, athletics, transportation.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: No answer
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? No answer
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? No answer
  • Revenue: $6.3 million in 2019, $9.6 million in 2022

Everett

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $2.09
  • Old levy rate: $3.07
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? It will fund where the state falls short in areas such as early learning, summer school, extended-day programs, teaching materials and equipment, transportation, music, art, drama, athletics and extracurricular activities, special education, professional training for staff, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) programs, gifted programs and ongoing facilities maintenance.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: The Legislature has not clearly defined basic education, rather only listed a handful of “enhancements” within EHSB 2242. The legislative decision to eliminate the state-mandated salary allocation model has further complicated the ability to define basic education. In addition, the state has not fully funded programs, such as special education, even though districts are legally and morally required to provide services to these students.  As a result, we cannot calculate a percentage.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? Everett has devoted a considerable amount of analysis to determine the level of local resources necessary to maintain current instructional programs and services for our 20,000 students as we transition to the new structure.  As in the past, if the state caps the district at a lesser amount, we will roll back the difference. Therefore we cannot calculate a rollback amount at this time.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? For the reasons provided in question numbers 4 and 5, there is not enough information to respond to this question.
  • Revenue: $44.2 million in 2019, $53.3 million in 2022

Federal Way

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.50
  • Old levy rate: $3.58
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Funding for 300 essential staff including teachers, nurses, security staff, counselors and bus drivers. This levy also supports enhanced-program funding for special education and English Language Learner (ELL) services, advanced learning opportunities, music, athletics and after-school programs.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: About 47 percent for basic education, 53 percent for enhancements.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? The district has based the new replacement levy on legislation created in HB 2242. Consequently, this EP&O levy is dropping by $20M from the current $53M to $33M (not to exceed a $1.50 per thousand).
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? Unlike other districts asking for the full amount, FWPS is asking voters for $20 million less per year; from $53 million to $33 million. This means local property owners will experience a significant tax decrease of 37 percent.
  • Revenue: $33 million

Highline

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.50
  • Old levy rate: $3.38
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? More teachers for smaller classes, instructional assistants for individual or small-group instruction, school nurses, school counselors, security officers, special education, sixth-grade outdoor education experience, athletics, bus transportation.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: This is difficult to answer without a strict definition of basic education. The Legislature has not defined it, and OSPI appears to be defining it as anything not paid for by the state. So, using this logic, 100 percent of levy proceeds would be for enhancements.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? This depends on the definition of basic education. We expect that once the promised state funding is fully allocated, some level of levy rollback would occur, but it is too early to quantify the amount.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? We would use the funding to pay for critical needs that are under-allocated by the state funding model.
  • Revenue: $50 million

Index

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $2.12 for 2019, $1.50 for 2020-2022
  • Old levy rate: $2.12
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Technology, curriculum, safety and security, smaller class sizes, extracurricular activities and professional development.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: Our district relies on local levy dollars to enhance and fund educational offerings and programs that are not fully funded by the state. They did not offer a percentage in answer to this question.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? There are many unknowns regarding House bill 2242 and how this shift in tax burden from the local levy to the state will impact small school districts in our state.  It appears that presently we will be charging $1.50/1000 or a certain amount per pupil.  Both of these scenarios appear to be much less than what we currently receive in taxes for our small district.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? See previous answer.
  • Revenue: $177,000

Issaquah

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.71 in 2019, $1.82 in 2020
  • Old levy rate: $2.32
  • Years of levy: 2
  • Term: 2020
  • What will the levy pay for? Issaquah has three levies on the ballot. A 2-year levy would pay for salaries for para-educators, substitute teachers, special education, highly capable, English Language Learner programs, professional development, transportation and maintenance staff, athletics, nurses, mental-health counselors and security staff. A one-year bus levy will buy 76 new buses. A four year building repair and technology will pay for critical repairs, maintenance and upgrades of technology, plus technology staff.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: The state defines basic education one way, we define it another. The same is true regarding what is considered an enhancement to basic education. It is unclear at this time what percentage will be allocated to what the state may term an enhancement.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? Regardless of whether the Legislature fully funds its formula for what it considers basic education, the Issaquah School District is not running a full authority levy. We are running at about 75 percent of authority, and it is only a two-year levy. If we were to roll back our local levy, it would be because of the shortage of teachers. If we are unable to hire sufficient staff to implement new programs, we would not need the money to pay for them.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? We plan to use the money that previously went to “basic education” to implement some programs that our community has been asking us to provide for many years. With the increase in state dollars that we expect, we now have a chance to implement high-school schedules that create opportunities for acceleration, exploration and remediation in the era of Core 24. It also allows us to begin an Elementary Dual Language Program, expand our Early Learning Programs, increase the number of mental-health and guidance counselors in our buildings, and put in mentoring supports for new teachers helping us to retain them and assure their success in the classroom.
  • Revenue: $40.5 million

Kent

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $2.25
  • Old levy rate: $2.77
  • Years of levy: 2 for operations levy, 6 for technology and critical repairs
  • Term: 2020 and 2024
  • What will the levy pay for? Kent has two levies on the ballot: a two-year measure for operations and a six-year technology and critical repairs. The operations levy pays for about one in five of all district employees and bridges the gap between state funding and community expectations, including transportation, athletics and the arts. The technology and repair levy will pay for computer equipment plus replace aging roofs and make other critical repairs.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: No answer
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? No answer
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? No answer
  • Revenue: $64 million to $70 million

Lake Washington

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.62
  • Old levy rate: $1.85
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Lake Washington is asking voters to approve two levies. One would pay for programs and operations not funded by the state, including staff, security, professional development, athletics, extracurricular activities, additional-course offerings and early learning. The capital-projects levy would pay for building and safety improvements plus technology needs.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: About 49 percent of the educational programs and operations levy, which is proposed as $1.03 per $1,000 of assessed valuation, would pay for basic education costs. The remaining 51 percent is for enhancements.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education?  If the Legislature were to come through with the additional funding needed to fully fund the underfunded areas of basic education, then the district would be able to collect even fewer levy dollars.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? In anticipation of the additional state funding, we are already seeking $40 million less than the full amount  authorized by the Legislature for our levy.
  • Revenue: $63.5 million

Marysville

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $3.64
  • Old levy rate: $4.06
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Marysville is asking voters to approve two levies. One would pay for programs and operations, including more teachers and aides for smaller class sizes, plus nurses, counselors, librarians and support staff, special education, arts, music and extracurricular activities. The technology and capital-projects levy will provide computers for students in grades 6 through 12, plus technology access in all grades, and Wi-Fi access for students, families and the community.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: We just don’t have the information yet to answer that question.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? Under EHB 2242, local levies are limited to the lesser of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value, or $2,500 per student. This negatively impacts districts with students and families with the most need. Therefore our district will continue to collect the maximum amount allowable by law.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? Under EHB 2242, local levies are intended for “enrichment” purposes only.  Any use of local levy dollars must comply with the new definitions and categories of “enrichment” contained in EHB 2242. This will affect how our district will be able to use funds to best meet our students’ and district’s needs.
  • Revenue: $26.5 million for the operations levy. $6 million for the building and technology levy.

Mercer Island

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $0.80
  • Old levy rate: $1.29
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Local levy dollars will continue to provide educational experiences beyond the state definition of basic education. Levy funds will go toward maintaining a seven-period day at the high school, advanced science and fine arts at both the high school and middle school, elementary K-5 music, art, PE and Spanish, and class-size reduction.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: According to current legislation, what constitutes basic education is not fully defined, and the state does not allocate funding according to the actual cost of these programs. Therefore, we will continue to support these programs with local levy dollars.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? Annually the district certifies to the county and OSPI that we will collect within the legal limits.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? The district will continue to pay for programs and activities that are not fully funded by the state. The district will maintain those programs that are beyond the definition of basic education, and consider the expansion of certain programs.
  • Revenue: Between $11.75 million and $12.75 million per year.

Monroe

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.50
  • Old levy rate: $3.00
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? The levy will pay for programs and services that are not funded or not fully funded by the state, including transportation, special education, athletics, curriculum, extracurricular activities, staff pay and benefits.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: Until the state has defined what is included in “full state funding” for basic education, we cannot speak to percentages.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? Under EHB 2242, local levies are limited to the lesser of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value, or $2,500 per student. In the Monroe School District the lesser is on our ballot, $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? Under EHB 2242, any use of local levy dollars must comply with the new definitions and categories of “enrichment” contained in EHB 2242.
  • Revenue: $10.35 million in 2019, to $15.74 million in 2022.

Mukilteo

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.93
  • Old levy rate: $2.87
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Mukilteo has two levies on the ballot. An Educational Programs Levy will pay for programs and activities that are not funded by the state. A Technology Capital Project Levy would provide funding to increase student access to technology and modernize technology systems within the school district.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: As currently defined by the state, “basic education” does not include full funding for programs that we feel should be included within that definition, such as special education and unfunded mandates such as some transportation costs. Therefore, because those programs will have to be funded somehow, the answer to the question is unknown at this time.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? The proposed levy was written with the new state law in mind and with the new restrictions on collections in place, so there wouldn’t be a roll back.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? When the state is supposed to be “fully funding” basic education at the start of the 2019-20 school year, the proposed levy would already be in place, and we will no longer be collecting at the higher levy rate.
  • Revenue: $53.5 million

Northshore

  • Proposed new total levy rate: Between $1.98 and $2.30
  • Old levy rate: $2.23
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Northshore has two levies on the ballot. A program and operations levy helps cover education that isn’t fully funded by the state or federal government, including four of the 24 credits required for high-school graduation, smaller classes, academic support for struggling and high-achieving students, special education and transportation, plus extracurricular activities. The second is a technology levy.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: The state has not provided a definition of “basic education” under the current accounting structure, which does not track the actual cost of basic education. For example, beginning with the class of 2019, the state will require 24 credits to graduate from high school but currently only funds 20. The existing levy covers about 26 percent of Northshore’s special education costs, or about $13 million.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? As it is written, EHB 2242 will not fully fund basic education programs such as special education and highly capable.  We don’t anticipate a substantial increase in state funding for those programs.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? We don’t believe EHB 2242 will fully fund basic education. The Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction has proposed technical fixes, which would remove that inequity and allow the Northshore School District to collect the estimated rate of $1.82 per $1,000 of assessed valuation, which is still $.11 lower than our current rate.
  • Revenue: $74 million

Riverview

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $2.73 in 2019, $1.94 in 2022
  • Old levy rate: $2.68
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Riverview has three levies on the ballot for current programs such as special education, for technology and capital projects, and for transportation. The transportation levy is for two years. Collections are expected to decrease over the four years.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: While an answer to that question would have been possible in years past, with so much uncertainty in legislation right now it’s difficult to tell.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? OSPI will provide guidance for rollback and the district will comply accordingly.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? See previous answer.
  • Revenue: $11.94 million in 2019, $10.67 million in 2022.

Shoreline

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.73 in 2019, $1.67 in 2022
  • Old levy rate: $2.24
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? The Shoreline levy fund programs that are not fully funded by state or federal funds. This includes: nurses, counselors, librarians, special and gifted education, utilities, technology, athletics, fine arts, staff professional development, field trips, safety, security and many other areas that allow our schools to provide students with a high-quality education.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: In order for a rollback of local levies to be considered, we need definitive answers from the state Legislature and OSPI on what is considered basic education and in what areas local-levy funds can be spent. Additionally, current projections are that the state will not fully fund basic education by 2019. For instance, it is not clear that the state will fund special education at a level that allows districts to meet our federal special-education mandates without the use of local-levy funds.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education?  Local levies are intended for “enrichment” purposes only under EHB 2242. Our use of local levy dollars would fund areas under the new definitions and categories of “enrichment” contained in the legislation.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? See previous answer.
  • Revenue: $21.5 million in 2019 to $28.5 million in 2022

Snohomish

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $2.00
  • Old levy rate: $3.68
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Snohomish has two levies on the ballot, one for operations and another for technology. They will pay for programs and services important to our community that are not funded or fully funded by the state, including school safety, student transportation, special education, technology, curriculum, co- and extracurricular activities, and overall staffing levels.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: This is very difficult to answer as there is no state definition of “basic education.”
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? According to EHB 2242, the amount that local districts can request for local levies to cover “enrichment” activities is $1.50/$1,000. This is a decrease from the Snohomish School District current levy amount of $3.24/$1,000.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? EHB 2242 has put a cap on local levies, therefore we are decreasing our levy amount from the current $3.24 to $1.50/$1,000.
  • Revenue: $20.1 million in 2019 to $30.65 million in 2022

Snoqualmie Valley

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.93
  • Old levy rate: $2.61
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Two Snoqualmie Valley levies, for operations and technology, will pay for programs and services including school nurses and counselors, special education, technology infrastructure and equipment, instructional coaches, extracurricular activities, transportation, teacher training, food services, curriculum and gifted education.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: This is difficult to answer, as the state’s definition of “basic education” for funding purposes is in many cases still inadequate to meet the basic needs of our students.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? Any future rollback of levy funds would be reviewed on an annual basis as part of the budget process, taking into account funding and expenditure levels, and programming, staffing and operational needs.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? As most of the new state funding is directed toward improving employee compensation and reducing class sizes in grades K-3, fewer local levy dollars are needed to backfill the gaps in those areas.  However, as stated previously, there are still a number of areas where state funding is not sufficient to maintain current levels of programming and services.
  • Revenue: $15.5 million

Stanwood Camano

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.83
  • Old levy rate: $2.23
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? The Stanwood levy is a facilities and technology levy, not an operations levy. It will pay for seven major school repair projects such as playground-safety improvements at three elementary schools, a new middle-school roof, replacing windows at another middle school and two new fire-alarm panels.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: This levy is all for capital projects, not basic education.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? The local levy that is for operations will likely be rolled back by about $3 million, but the district is not sure about the final number yet.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? See previous answer.
  • Revenue: $2 million

Sultan

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $1.50
  • Old levy rate: $3.60
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? The levy will pay for special education, additional staffing, extra- and co-curricular activities, transportation, curriculum and security.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: The Legislature has not clearly defined basic education, rather only listed a handful of “enhancements” within EHSB 2242. As a result, we cannot calculate a percentage at this time.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? We cannot calculate a rollback at this time.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? There is not enough information to respond to this question.
  • Revenue: $2.45 million

Tahoma

  • Proposed new total levy rate: $2.03
  • Old levy rate: $3.46
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Tahoma has three levies on the ballot: a four-year replacement levy for programs and operations, another four-year levy for technology and a two-year transportation levy. The programs and operations levy pay for programs and staff not funded or underfunded by the state, including special education, extracurricular activities, transportation, support staff, teacher pay beyond the 180-days funded by the state, safety and security, and substitute teachers.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: There is no clear definition of basic education, which makes estimates difficult to achieve. What is clear to us is that the state is not fully funding education for our students.
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? Because there is no clear definition of basic education, we will assess changes in state funding as they take place, and our school board will make a determination about levy rollbacks.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? The board will monitor the level of state funding and what is necessary from the levy to maintain current education programs and staffing.
  • Revenue: $14.45 million in 2019, $17.2 million in 2022

Vashon Island

  • Proposed new total levy rate: Between $1.56 and $1.82
  • Old levy rate: $1.50
  • Years of levy: 4
  • Term: 2022
  • What will the levy pay for? Special education, staff training, salaries for paraprofessionals, substitute teachers, counselor support and school secretaries, extracurricular programs, security, maintenance, arts and music programs, plus other enrichment programs.
  • Percentage, basic education vs. enhancements: The state has not provided a definition of “basic education,” so we have no easy way to track the actual costs yet. Our current M&O levy pays for and/or supplements roughly 29 percent of our overall costs, with the state paying for 65 percent and the federal government (mainly through grants) funds the other 6 percent. 
  • Will you roll back the levy when the state fully pays for basic education? If, and this is a huge if, the Legislature was able to “fully fund basic education,” then, yes we as a district would look to roll back our local levies.  By how much, this would be a wait and see.
  • If not, what will you do with the extra dollars? Vashon Island School District is expecting to lose money because of new restrictions on how much they can raise through levies, so their levy rate is already going down about 26 cents per $1,000 in assessed valuation.
  • Revenue: Between $4.6 million and $5.3 million.