Whatever you’re trying to move (mirrors, china, clothing), there’s a box specially designed to keep it safe in transit.

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The last time we moved was in 2001. The time before that was in 1987.

I hate moving, although I know that the hour is coming when I will have to leave my current home and relocate to something that’s more conducive to retirement (i.e. mortgage-free with a lower property tax).

Traditionally, when those of us who do the bulk of packing ourselves need boxes, we go to the supermarket or the liquor store and ask for used ones. For the more delicate stuff, I buy new, usually at U-Haul or similar outlets.

The Paper and Packaging Board says I have been doing it all wrong.

Older boxes aren’t as sturdy and may lack such helpful features as cutouts for hands, or even top flaps for taping down box contents, the board says. Make the box accommodate your belongings, not the other way around.

Among other Paper and Packaging Board tips:

• If boxes are too large, overfilling makes contents impossible to carry. Heavy items such as books and kitchen supplies should go in smaller boxes to minimize the risk of damage.

• If boxes are too small, you can’t maximize available truck space and may end up creating more trips loading and unloading.

• Whatever you’re trying to move (mirrors, china, clothing), there’s a box specially designed to keep it safe in transit. Valuables, including such breakables as fine china, should be packed in a barrel or dish box. Wardrobe moving boxes are great for any clothing on hangers, whereas suitcases are best for clothing items stored in drawers.

• Don’t underestimate how many new boxes you’ll need. Consider the square footage of your home, then use the Paper and Packaging Board’s online box calculator to determine the right number.