Five hotels that feature farmers markets with local vendors and artisans.

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The hottest attraction at your hotel may be its farmers market.

Properties around the country are increasingly hosting markets featuring local vendors. Most are open to the public, but a few, like the quarterly market at the Rosewood CordeValle in San Martin, Calif., are exclusively for hotel guests.

There, six to eight food purveyors set up stands with cooking stations highlighting ways to use in-season produce. The owners of a local cherry farm, for example, might show guests how to use the fruit to bake a pie and make a martini. Local wines and beers are also served at the market, and the day ends with a delivery of cheese, fruit and chocolate to a guest’s room. The fee: $185 a person for unlimited small plates and drinks.

Guests and locals are invited to the year-round market at the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort and Spa in Hawaii. Held on Tuesdays and Thursdays in its open-air atrium, the market has several dozen vendors selling goods like sugar cane juice and butter made with Kona coffee beans.

Also open to all is the market held on Fridays and Sundays from mid-May through November at the Charles Hotel in Cambridge, Mass., where organic produce, cheeses and jams are among the foods for sale.

The fruit and vegetable stand at the Ritz-Carlton, Charlotte.
The fruit and vegetable stand at the Ritz-Carlton, Charlotte.

The Peninsula Bangkok hosts the Thiptara craft market on the last Saturday of every month for its guests and the public. In addition to selling handicrafts, vendors offer sustainably produced coconut water as well as fruits and vegetables.

And the Ritz-Carlton, Charlotte, has a stand set up daily in its lobby filled with vegetables and fruits from its rooftop garden as well as from 20 local farms; guests and locals can stop by to stock up. The free mini-market is a way to engage nearby residents and give guests healthful food options, says Seamus Gallagher, the director sales and marketing for the property in North Carolina. “We welcome the surrounding community but also want guests to be able to grab an apple or pear picked that morning on their way in or out,” he says.