The ruling is the latest impediment for the resort, known as Trump International Golf Links, which opened in 2012 near Balmedie, a few miles north of Aberdeen, despite significant opposition from the local community.

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LONDON — Britain’s highest court unanimously rejected on Wednesday an attempt by Donald Trump, the real- estate developer and Republican presidential candidate, to block the construction of a wind farm near his luxury golf resort in northeast Scotland.

The ruling is the latest impediment for the resort, known as Trump International Golf Links, which opened in 2012 near Balmedie, a few miles north of Aberdeen, despite significant opposition from the local community.

Trump has vowed to stop further development on the project if the offshore wind farm — 11 turbines, which would be visible from the golf resort 2.2 miles away — goes forward.

In a 27-page ruling, the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom rejected an argument by Trump’s lawyers that the wind farm had been improperly approved by Scottish officials in March 2013 because it did not comply with a 1989 law and because there was a problem with the planning application.

Fergus Ewing, the Scottish energy minister, wrote on Twitter that the government was “pleased that the Supreme Court has unanimously found in our favor.”

In a statement, George A. Sorial, the executive vice president and counsel for The Trump Organization, Trump’s development company in New York, denounced the ruling as “extremely unfortunate for the residents of Aberdeen and anyone who cares about Scotland’s economic future.”

Sorial said the wind farm, known as the European Offshore Wind Deployment Center, would “completely destroy the bucolic Aberdeen Bay and cast a terrible shadow upon the future of tourism for the area.”

“We will evaluate the court’s decision and continue to fight this proposal on every possible front,” he said.

Local opposition to the resort inspired a 2011 documentary film, “You’ve Been Trumped,” which Trump’s lawyers tried unsuccessfully to stop the BBC from broadcasting in 2012.

Scottish officials approved the resort in 2008, after determining that the economic benefits outweighed environmental concerns. But the subsequent approval of the wind farm drew outrage from Trump, who clashed on the subject with Alex Salmond, who was the first minister of Scotland until last year.

Trump told a parliamentary committee that the wind turbines were “one of the most serious problems Scotland will have or has had.”

Last year, Trump bought Turnberry, a prestigious golf course in southwest Scotland, an action that suggested that he might not invest much more money into the resort near Aberdeen.

Although Trump is leading many opinion polls in the race to become the Republican nominee for president in the United States, he is an unpopular figure in Scotland.

More than 560,000 people in Britain have signed an online petition introduced by Suzanne Kelly, a Scottish woman who opposed the golf development, calling for Trump to be barred from entering Britain. The text of the petition cites British laws against hate speech.

Nicola Sturgeon, who succeeded Salmond as first minister of Scotland, withdrew Trump’s status as a business ambassador to Scotland last week after he called for Muslims to be barred from entering the United States. Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen has stripped Trump of an honorary degree it awarded him in 2010.

Trump’s mother was born in Scotland and moved to the United States in the 1930s. She died in 2000.