The Obama administration announced Monday it will resume using military tribunals to try suspected terrorists held at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and will continue indefinite detentions of suspects without trial.

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WASHINGTON — The Obama administration announced Monday it will resume using military tribunals to try suspected terrorists held at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, but officials said they’re not giving up on trials in civilian courts and are still considering their options for trying 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other accused 9/11 plotters.

President Obama also signed an executive order for the United States to continue indefinite detentions of suspects without trial, a move strongly opposed by civil-rights groups and some congressional Democrats.

Aides said Obama remains committed to closing the detention center at Guantánamo, more than a year after he missed his own deadline to close the facility.

Anthony Romero, the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union, said that Obama has created a “troubling new normal” and that his steps to give detainees more procedural rights are “just window dressing for the reality that today’s executive order institutionalizes indefinite detention, which is unlawful, unwise and un-American.”

The administration will continue to seek repeal of congressional restrictions on trying terrorism suspects in civilian courts, officials said.

They declined to speak about how Monday’s announcements would affect the trial of the accused 9/11 plotters. “We’re not here to comment on the future of any particular case,” one official said. “We’re working through what options there are. It’s a decision we’re going to have to be making in due time.”

That lack of clarity and delay in bringing the cases to trial continues to frustrate many of the relatives of those who died in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Jim Riches, a deputy fire chief in New York whose son died responding to the attacks, said he could support civilian or military trials, but he’s fed up with the delay.

“President Obama promised us swift and certain justice in February of 2009,” Riches said. “More than two years later, he still hasn’t made a decision. I think it’s a disgrace and another slap in the face of 9/11 families. Almost 10 years later, we haven’t seen justice.”