Here’s how area members of Congress voted on major issues in the week ending May 11.

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Here’s how area members of Congress voted on major issues in the week ending May11:

House

Storage of nuclear waste: The House on May 10 passed, 340-72, a bill to revive a long-dormant federal plan for permanently storing tens of thousands of metric tons of radioactive waste from active and retired nuclear power plants in 39 states and government weapons sites in at least six states in a repository at Nevada`s Yucca Mountain. A yes vote was to send HR 3053 to the Senate.

Voting yes: Suzan DelBene, D-Medina, Rick Larsen, D-Lake Stevens, Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Camas, Dan Newhouse, R-Sunnyside, Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Spokane, Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, Dave Reichert, R-Auburn, Denny Heck, D-Olympia

Voting no: Pramila Jayapal, D-Seattle, Adam Smith, D-Bellevue.

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Local veto over waste storage: Voting 80 for and 332 against, the House on May 10 defeated an amendment to HR 3053 that sought to require the federal government to obtain approvals from an array of local and tribal jurisdictions and the Nevada governor before it could designate Yucca Mountain as the nation`s permanent repository for tens of thousands of metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A yes vote was to adopt an amendment requiring broad-based local consent to the siting decision.

Voting yes: Smith

Voting no: DelBene, Larsen, Herrera Beutler, Newhouse, McMorris Rodgers, Kilmer, Jayapal, Reichert, Heck

Discrimination in auto lending: Voting 234 for and 175 against, the House on May 8 repealed a 5-year-old action by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau against car and truck loans that charge higher interest rates to minority borrowers than to other similarly qualified borrowers. Backers of the repeal measure (SJ Res 57) said the bureau is prohibited by the 2010 Dodd-Frank law from regulating auto dealerships. But the bureau asserts authority under the 1974 Equal Credit Opportunity Act to combat discrimination in auto credit issued by third-party lenders. That law prohibits creditors from discriminating based on race, color, religion, national origin, sex, marital status or age. A yes vote was to send the repeal measure to President DonaldTrump.

Voting yes: Herrera Beutler, Newhouse, McMorris Rodgers, Reichert

Voting no: DelBene, Larsen, Kilmer, Jayapal, Smith, Heck

Limiting antitrust enforcement: Voting 230 for and 185 against, the House on May 9 passed a GOP-drafted bill (HR 5645) that would strip the Federal Trade Commission of its 104-year-old authority to use in-house administrative judges for determining whether proposed corporate mergers and acquisitions would violate antitrust laws. The FTC and Department of Justice have historically exercised dual authority over “trustbusting” laws designed to prevent business monopolies and preserve market competition. This bill would direct the FTC to pursue antitrust enforcement only in federal courts, thus disbanding or neutering the agency`s administrative tribunals. The bill was backed by business groups including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which often see the DOJ as easier to deal with on antitrust matters. The measure was opposed by groups including Consumers Union on grounds it would weaken FTC defenses against monopolistic business practices. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate.

Voting yes: Herrera Beutler, Newhouse, McMorris Rodgers, Reichert

Voting no: DelBene, Larsen, Kilmer, Jayapal, Smith, Heck

Drug costs, corporate mergers: Voting 193 for and 220 against, the House on May 9 defeated a Democratic motion that sought to prohibit a pending antitrust enforcement bill (HR 5645, above) from applying to proposed corporate mergers and acquisitions that would lead to unreasonable increases in prescription-drug prices. A yes vote was to adopt a motion concerning rising drug prices.

Voting yes: DelBene, Larsen, Kilmer, Jayapal, Smith, Heck

Voting no: Herrera Beutler, Newhouse, McMorris Rodgers, Reichert

SENATE

Michael Brennan nomination: Voting 49 for and 46 against, the Senate on May 10 confirmed Michael B. Brennan, 54, a lawyer in private practice and former Milwaukee County Circuit Court judge, for a lifetime appointment on the Chicago-based 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which oversees federal trial courts in Illinois, Wisconsin and Indiana. Supporters said Brennan was highly recommended by an American Bar Association panel on judicial nominees, while critics took issue with his conservative public stands on issues including mass incarceration, gender equity in the workplace and women`s reproductive rights.

Voting no: Maria Cantwell, D, Patty Murray, D

KEY VOTES AHEAD: The House will take up a five-year farm bill in the week of May 14, while the Senate will debate judicial nominations.