Here’s how area members of Congress voted on major issues in the week ending July 13.

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WASHINGTON — Here’s how area members of Congress voted on major issues in the week ending July 13.

House

Renewal of federal fisheries law: By a vote of 222 for and 193 against, the House on July 11 passed a GOP-drafted bill (HR 200) that would extend through fiscal 2022 the main law for regulating commercial and recreational fishing in federal coastal waters ranging from 3 to 200 miles offshore. The 1976 Magnuson-Stevens law is designed to conserve stocks and prevent overfishing while protecting declining species and fragile habitats and providing economic and recreational opportunities. This bill would clear the way for increased commercial and sport fishing by steps such as scaling back science-based catch limits and conservation measures, shortening time frames for restocking populations and expanding from 3 to 9 miles the zone for sport fishing of species including red snapper off the Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana coasts. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration spends nearly $600 million annually to administer the law with the help of locally run regional councils.

Voting yes: Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Camas, Dan Newhouse, R-Sunnyside, Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Spokane, Dave Reichert, R-Auburn

Voting no: Suzan DelBene, D-Medina, Rick Larsen, D-Lake Stevens, Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, Pramila Jayapal, D-Seattle, Adam Smith, D-Bellevue, Denny Heck, D-Olympia

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Constitutional amendment to nullify citizens united: Voting 228-184, the House on July 11 blocked a Democratic bid for floor debate on a proposed constitutional amendment (HJ Res 31) that would restore broad congressional and state powers to regulate money in politics. This would nullify the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United ruling, which equated political spending with free speech in a way that allows corporations, unions, super PACs and other groups to anonymously spend unlimited, undisclosed sums to advocate the election or defeat of specific candidates. A yes vote was in opposition to calling the measure up for debate.

Voting yes: Herrera Beutler, Newhouse, McMorris Rodgers, Reichert

Voting no: DelBene, Larsen, Kilmer, Jayapal, Smith, Heck

Expanded campaign-finance disclosures: Voting 225-186, the House on July 11 blocked a Democratic bid for floor debate on a bill (HR 6239) that would require corporations, unions, super PACs and other entities to publicly disclose their funding of political activity and identify their large contributors. A sponsoring organization`s top-ranking official would have to publicly certify campaign advertisements, just as candidates must for their campaign spots. A yes vote was in opposition to calling the bill up for debate.

Voting yes: Herrera Beutler, Newhouse, McMorris Rodgers, Reichert

Voting no: DelBene, Larsen, Kilmer, Jayapal, Smith, Heck

Senate

Supporting NATO after Trump criticism: Voting 97-2, the Senate on July 10 adopted a measure intended to bolster the North Atlantic Treaty Organization against President Donald Trump`s verbal assaults on the 69-year-old Western alliance. Trump has charged that member countries fail to pay their fair share of the cost defending Europe, among other criticisms. The motion was offered in relation to a military spending bill (HR 5515) for fiscal 2019. A yes vote was to adopt the resolution.

Voting yes: Maria Cantwell, D, Patty Murray, D

KEY VOTES AHEAD: The Senate will conduct votes on judicial and executive-branch nominees in the week of July 16, while the House schedule was to be announced.