Nothing seemed to deter King County voters from casting their ballots Tuesday in an election that was historic not only because of who was running at the top of the ballot but also because it marked the final time King County voters could vote in person.

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It rained in King County on Election Day. Didn’t matter.

Lines snaked outside many polling places during the morning and evening rush hours. Didn’t matter.

Nothing seemed to deter King County voters from casting their ballots Tuesday in an election that was historic not only because of who was running at the top of the ballot but also because it marked the final time King County voters could vote in person.

With a coffee in one hand and a muffin in the other, Shannon O’Neill-Creighton, who turned 18 the week after the 2004 presidential election, voted at Meany Middle School in central Seattle before heading to class at the University of Washington.

“People are smiling and checking in with each other to see if you’ve voted,” she said. “I think it’s bringing out the best in Seattle. People aren’t usually this … extroverted.”

Based on voting traffic at the polls Tuesday, King County may well meet its predicted turnout of 85 percent of registered voters, which would be a county record. Two-thirds of the county’s voters, or about 750,000 people, are estimated to have voted by mail.

Statewide, more than 83 percent of the 3.6 million registered voters likely cast ballots, said Secretary of State Sam Reed, who added that it’s possible — once the final totals are in — that turnout will surpass the record of 84.5 percent, set in 1944.

County election officials, still stinging from criticism related to the count of the 2004 gubernatorial election, reported few complaints from voters or glitches in the system.

A handful of early-morning voters at Whitworth Elementary School in Southeast Seattle had to fill out their ballots a second time after the first ballots, taken from a supply dampened by rain, could not be read by the electronic tabulation machine.

At Mount Baker Presbyterian Church, also in Southeast Seattle, early voters mistakenly were given provisional ballots, but the error soon was corrected.

The glitches did not prevent anyone from voting, said Brooke Bascom, a county elections spokeswoman.

Poll-site voting in the state took place only in King and Pierce counties. The Pierce County auditor reported waits as long as two hours at some polling places, and long lines meant people were still voting even after polls closed at 8 p.m.

Tuesday’s voters received commemorative “Farewell to polls. I Voted!” stickers from poll workers.

Monita Horn and her husband have been casting ballots at Issaquah City Hall since they moved to the city in 1964.

“We’ve always voted in person because I think there’s less chance of fraud,” the 70-year-old housewife said. Asked how she feels about the county moving to an all-mail system, Horn shrugged: “It’ll be different.”

Eileen Saunders, in charge of the polling place at Northgate Community Center, said she has seen old friends reconnect after casting their ballots. It’s unfortunate that tradition won’t continue, she said.

After voting at the Sunset Hill Community Club in Ballard, Tim Anderson, 50, snapped a photo of his 19-year-old son, James, who voted for the first time. Father and son went to the polls together, partly to share the experience.

“I always vote in person,” said Anderson, who has lived in his Ballard neighborhood for 35 years. “It’s like the difference between getting auto-payments from your boss or getting an actual check.”

Kate Akyuz, 33, dropped off her absentee ballot inside the Meany Middle School polling place instead of mailing it.

“I wanted to physically see it go into the box — somehow it didn’t seem right to mail it,” she said. “There’s way more energy this year — you can feel it all around.”

Stuart Eskenazi: 206-464-2293 or seskenazi@seattletimes.com. Seattle Times staff reporters Sara Jean Green, Michelle Ma and Jack Broom contributed to this report.