The risk of infection from eating food tainted with a common type of salmonella or a dangerous strain of E. coli fell significantly in 2014, according to a report published Thursday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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The risk of infection from eating food tainted with a common type of salmonella or a dangerous strain of E. coli fell significantly in 2014, according to a report published Thursday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That’s the good news. The bad news is that rates of infection with other types of pathogens — including bacteria like Campylobacter and Vibrio — are on the rise.

Overall, the incidence of food-borne infections in the U.S. was about the same in 2014 as it was for 2006-08, a baseline period that coincided with an E. coli outbreak tied to tainted spinach that sickened at least 205 people and caused three deaths.

“Progress has been made in decreasing contamination of some foods and reducing illness caused by some pathogens,” says the report in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. “However, little or no recent reductions for most infections have occurred.”

For the full year, the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network identified 19,542 infections associated with contaminated food, including 4,445 hospitalizations and 71 deaths. These laboratory-confirmed infections occurred in the 10 states that are part of the network, known as FoodNet.

Salmonella was the top culprit in food-borne illnesses, with an incidence of 15.45 infections per 100,000 people, the report says. In 2014, various strains of the wily bacterium caused outbreaks in cucumbers, bean sprouts, chia powder and raw cashew cheese. It also caused outbreaks in Tyson chicken, backyard poultry flocks and pet bearded dragons.

Campylobacter was a close second, with an incidence of 13.45 infections per 100,000 people. This bacterium turned up in raw milk in Wisconsin and Utah, along with chicken livers and oysters, according to Seattle attorney Bill Marler, who specializes in cases involving food-borne illnesses.

The FoodNet surveillance system covers about 48 million Americans who live in Oregon, New Mexico, Minnesota, Tennessee, Georgia, Maryland, Connecticut and parts of California, New York and Colorado, about 15 percent of the U.S. population.

Public health officials from these 10 states work with the CDC, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration to monitor nine pathogens known to cause food-borne illnesses.