It's definitely time for travelers to rethink the luggage tag. We've all heard about not putting one's home address on the tag because crooks will dash right over and break into your house. OK, that could happen. But the bigger issue is that you expose information about yourself to prying eyes.

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It’s definitely time for travelers to rethink the luggage tag.

We’ve all heard about not putting one’s home address on the tag because crooks will dash right over and break into your house.

OK, that could happen. But the bigger issue is that you expose information about yourself to prying eyes, said Kevin Coffey, president of the Web site Corporate Travel Safety.

Do you really want the drunk from seat 15C to know your name and where you work? Or allow the corporate spy to take a chance that you have valuable documents?

So use a minimum of contact info — a first initial, your last name, your cellphone number (or the phone at your destination or where someone will answer and tell the caller where you are) and perhaps an e-mail address if it doesn’t show too much personal information.

Use a secure tag (a metal ring is better than leather, which can stretch and snap), and put it on before you leave home “so you don’t expose the information at the airport or other departure point or wind up using less-secure tags,” said Chris Grniet, vice president with Kroll Security Group, a global risk-consulting company.

Because baggage handles can snap off — airport conveyor belts can be killers — put your name and contact info on a slip of paper inside the suitcase, too.

But luggage tags aren’t just for checked baggage anymore. You should have one on your carry-on bag and every other separate article you carry. Fliers can get flustered and leave things behind, so tagging every item increases the chances you’ll be reunited.