Cabin fever has set in, so let’s get out into an online world that’s bursting with things to see and do. Here are a few carefully curated options:

Kaboom! Check out these volcanoes

Google has some amazing tours at artsandculture.withgoogle.com, including one of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Watch the video, and afterward, spin around for a 360-degree view of the park, go inside a lava tube and stand on a cliff as volcanoes erupt nearby. Then you can head to the park’s website at nps.gov/havo and take a live look at what the volcanoes are doing. The webcams are operating even while the park is closed. Is your kid fired up about building a volcano now? Inspiration Laboratories has collected 10 ways to do it (inspirationlaboratories.com/10-ways-to-make-a-volcano-with-kids).

Try kirigami

What can you make with simple white paper? Artist Ayumi Shibata constructs entire cities, forests and scenes (see them at ayumishibata.com). Kids can take a look at her art and then try their own kirigami project (babbledabbledo.com/science-for-kids-kirigami-water-blossoms).

Step aboard Air Force One

The Museum of Flight in Seattle has a virtual tour of the Boeing jet used by Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon (museumofflight.org/aircraft/boeing-vc-137b-707-120sam-970-air-force-one). Walk inside, spin around in place and even take measurements. You can find more 3D tours of famous aircraft, from the NASA space shuttle trainer to Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner, at museumofflight.org/Explore-The-Museum/Step-Inside.

Make rock candy

Yes, kids can do science and EAT SUGAR at the same time. And you probably have all the ingredients at home already. The Pacific Science Center’s Curiosity at Home page (pacificsciencecenter.org/events-programs/curiosity-at-home) includes a rock candy recipe under “past activities.” Add food coloring to make your results extra interesting.

Take an online trip to New York City

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s MetKids page (metmuseum.org/art/online-features/metkids) has an immersive map that kids can click their way through for an up-close view of treasures from across the globe. Then they can hop into the time machine, pick the places and times that interest them, and explore artifacts from far away and long ago.