Maria Alyokhina, a member of the famously imprisoned Russian band Pussy Riot, will perform in “Burning Doors,” a play about her life that she produced with The Belarus Free Theatre. It runs at On the Boards from Sept. 28 to Oct. 1.

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I wasn’t sure what I expected when Maria “Masha” Alyokhina answered her phone, but it sure wasn’t a soft voice and easy laugh.

In my mind, she will forever be jumping around on the altar of a Moscow cathedral in a brightly colored balaclava with her fellow members of Pussy Riot, performing a “punk prayer” in protest of Orthodox Church leaders’ support for President Vladimir Putin, and urging the Virgin Mary to become a feminist.

Alyokhina and her bandmates Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Yekaterina Samutsevich were convicted in 2012 of “hooliganism motivated by religious hatred.” Samutsevich was freed on probation, but Alyokhina and Tolokonnikova were sent to prison, where Alyokhina endured humiliating gynecological exams, went on a hunger strike and was put in solitary confinement for five months.

Once released after 21 months, she continued resisting.

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During the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Alyokhina and her bandmates were attacked by Cossacks with horsewhips. And earlier this month, she and bandmate Olga Borisova were detained outside a prison east of Moscow after hanging a banner urging the release of Ukrainian filmmaker Oleg Sentsov.

On the phone from Moscow, Alyokhina was happy to talk about her next act — this one on an actual stage. She will perform in “Burning Doors,” a play about her life that she produced with The Belarus Free Theatre. It runs at On the Boards from Sept. 28 to Oct. 1. (This fall she is also releasing a memoir called “Riot Days,” about her time in prison.)

The play not only covers Alyokhina’s story, but those of Russian performance artist Petr Pavlensky and Sentsov, who was convicted of plotting terrorist attacks — a charge he called groundless and punishment for his opposition to the Russian takeover.

“Art should be less entertainment and more politically involved,” Alyokhina said. “Cinema, spoken word, street theater. This really works. I know it by our experience and the experience of more political activists in Russia. Politicians will react.”

Indeed, when The Public Theater in New York put on a production of “Julius Caesar” depicting the Roman leader as President Donald Trump, Trump’s son, Donald Jr. tweeted: “I wonder how much of this ‘art’ is funded by taxpayers? Serious question, when does ‘art’ become political speech & does that change things?”

President Trump has also proposed removing the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment of the Arts, even though their budgets amount to $300 million — a fraction of the overall federal budget.

After Meryl Streep criticized Trump in her Golden Globes speech — without ever mentioning his name — he tweeted that she was “one of the most overrated actresses in Hollywood.” He said the same of the cast and producers of “Hamilton” after Vice President Mike Pence was booed by the audience and addressed from the stage by actor Brandon Victor Dixon, who urged him to “uphold our unalienable rights, sir.” Trump said Pence was “harassed.”

“I think authoritarianism is spreading throughout the world,” Alyokhina said, “and it’s a sign to all of us to unite and resist. Donald Trump happened because, in my opinion, somehow a lot of people forgot that they should fight for what they believe. A lot of people in the United States did not vote this time.

“But this is past,” she said. “It has already happened. And now it’s time to think about why it happened, and what we can do.”

After all, she said, our two countries have a lot in common. We can learn from what she and others have endured.

“Russia can be one of the biggest examples of what can happen with countries,” she said. “Seventeen years, Putin is president of Russia. You can see what can happen if you have such a crazy asshole in power.”

The number of those arrested and charged with “hooliganism” in Russia is on the rise, she said. People have been imprisoned for Facebook posts, for holding up blank posters “without any words.”

“And I don’t think you want a future like this.”

But remember, she said: “This power, all this oppression is all based on fear. They are all afraid to lose this power and that’s why they oppress people who don’t agree with them.”

So what to do? Stay involved, she said. Take risks, as she and her bandmates do.

“Political acts are one of the strongest weapons,” Alyokhina said, “and so I really know and believe that political acts can change the world.”

That Pussy Riot became a cause célèbre — spurring a “Free Pussy Riot” campaign complete with social-media madness, celebrity shout-outs, T-shirts and a run on brightly colored balaclavas — didn’t so much make Alyokhina happy, as deeply committed to her role as a dissident.

“I think there’s a responsibility,” she said. “And when you feel this responsibility and you feel that what you are doing is important and see results, this makes me happy.

“But like all the things in the world, it takes time, usually.”

Her prison term cost her time with her now-10-year-old son, Filipp, who came to visit her there.

“While I cannot say it’s OK to have an experience like that,” she said, “he knows all the reasons. And he’s proud that he’s my son.”

He has contributed drawings to her memoir.

“He is my teacher in my life.”

The time she spent in prison changed her. (She served 23 of a 24-month sentence.)

“I became more determined,” she said. “Any experience is making you stronger if you are open to it and are not afraid to act as yourself.

“If you are saying the truth, why should you fear?”