As the latest manic organic revolution has taken hold, Americans are increasingly looking for ways to make their lives — and their...

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As the latest manic organic revolution has taken hold, Americans are increasingly looking for ways to make their lives — and their holidays — cleaner and greener. Blame rising fuel costs. Blame the spinach scare. Heck, if you want to, blame Al Gore — as if he hasn’t had to shoulder enough already.

“People want to celebrate the holiday, but we care about the impact that it has on the environment,” says Mark Smallwood, green mission specialist (actual title!) for the Mid-Atlantic region of Whole Foods Markets, which has added 40 percent more environmentally sound gift items to its offerings this year due to rising demand.

It’s the incremental steps, such as stringing energy-efficient LED Christmas lights, that make green living relevant and relatively easy, says green lifestyle guru and author Danny Seo. If your mantel calls for a different kind of twinkling light, a luxurious lineup of soy-based candles, such as Method’s, will send 90 percent less soot into the air than all-paraffin candles ($6 at www.methodhome.com).

Find useful things that can double as tree ornaments, such as Viva Terra’s sleek slivers of agate, which can be used as ornaments today and napkin rings or coasters after the holiday ($49 for a set of six at www.vivaterra.com). And gifts can be wrapped in recycled papers such as Paporganics’ modern line and sent off with missives made from the same (prices vary; available at select Whole Foods Markets and www.paporganics.com).

“We’ve realized that we can use Christmas to celebrate the Earth,” says Smallwood, “and we can celebrate the Earth through Christmas.”