Amberleigh West, 24, of Mount Vernon, will be one of two Playmates in the final issue of Playboy magazine to include nudity, as it searches for more profitability in the Internet age.

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MOUNT VERNON — A footnote in the history of the sexual revolution is a 24-year-old woman who grew up here.

When you meet Amberleigh West at a local espresso bar, it’s not a Raquel Welch or Pam Anderson type you see. It’s a 5-6, 110-pound young woman who really does look like …

“The girl next door?” says West. “I represent that.”

The combined January/February issue of Playboy magazine will feature two Playmates and two centerfolds, and West is one of them.

It will be the last edition of the magazine to include nudity.

After those issues, Playboy’s readers will still see the likes of West, just not all of her.

“We’re kind of going back to the classic, suggestive and less-explicit photography,” says Jason Buhrmester, Playboy’s editorial director. “We’re getting back to arts, literature and politics.”

All print media is struggling, and men’s magazines like Playboy and “laddies” magazines like Maxim are no exception. Go to a convenience store and you’ll find a magazine rack, if there is one, containing fewer and fewer titles.

West herself was trying to figure out where in Mount Vernon she could buy a copy of the Playboy in which she is featured. Maybe the 7-Eleven, maybe a grocery store that is kind of “sketchy.” It’s on the stands Friday.

West has seen very few issues of the magazine.

She did see some at the Playboy Mansion, which she visited last year. She even met Hugh Hefner there for five minutes. He said, “Nice to meet you,” and posed for a quick snapshot. Hugh, of course, was in his pajamas.

West says she also saw some old Playboys at a vintage shop in the Pike Place Market.

The magazine is not something one often finds in a twenty-something’s apartment.

For men’s magazines to survive, they need to figure out: What does the 2015 version of the advertiser-sought American male ages 25 to 30 want?

Other than he wants the obvious.

It used to be, back at its peak in 1975, that Playboy had a paid circulation of 5.6 million. Men of a certain age all have stories about covert copies of the magazine that high-school boys passed around.

Playboy was a success from its first issue in December 1953 that featured Marilyn Monroe on the cover and as a centerfold. It sold for 50 cents back then, which is $4.45 in today’s dollars. West’s issue has a cover price of $9.99.

Bettie Page, Jane Mansfield, Pamela Anderson, Anna Nicole Smith and Jenny McCarthy are other well-known Playmates.

And MTV-generation types will remember the Playmates in music videos for Van Halen’s “Hot For Teacher,” ZZ Tops’ “Gimme All Your Lovin’” and Rod Stewart’s “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy.” Weezer’s “Beverly Hills” featured 18 Playmates.

But in the digital era, when it comes to explicitness, you can’t compete with the Internet.

Playboy’s circulation now is about 800,000. These days the money for the franchise is in the brand and licensing.

“There is an information overload. You can look for almost anything online,” says Buhrmester.

So Playboy decided to go retro.

That young male reader, says Buhrmester, is “a high/low mixture of culture.”

He has recently gotten out of college, “has a little bit of money,” is in his first career job, maybe needs to buy a new suit and likes video games and fantasy football.

So, says Buhrmester, you offer him name writers, like when Playboy published Hemingway, as well as a guide to buying his next car.

As Playboy goes through its “major brand realignment,” Amberleigh West is experiencing life as a glamour model in the Internet age.

As of Thursday, she had 49,900 followers on Instagram, adding several thousand just this week. She has 9,350 Facebook friends.

“I’m not embarrassed about my body,” says West.

West’s family and boyfriend all support her.

Says West’s mom, Heidi Young, 49, “I’m excited for her. I’ve always encouraged her to go for her dreams.”

A 2010 Mount Vernon High graduate, and then a 2012 Skagit Valley College graduate as a paralegal, she decided to pursue a career as a model.

Her Instagram account is full of glamour photos. Some are digitally censored.

It was on Instagram that in September 2014 a Playboy photographer found West’s image and asked if she’d come to Los Angeles for a test shoot. She bought the airplane ticket.

“I took a chance. I thought, ‘What the heck, nothing else to do.’ It paid off,” she says.

Buhrmester says about finding a Playmate, “It’s an intangible art.”

She can’t come across as “a sterile fashion model,” he says. A Playmate needs to be someone who a young male reader could picture visiting at her apartment, planning a vacation with, says Buhrmester.

Presumably for West, with her Playmate title also will come future gigs.

In October, she spent a week at a shoot for a film with the unusual title, “Kill Her Goats,” that features two other Playmates.

She’s also gotten used to seeing her image used on websites she’s never heard of.

That site in which she’s supposedly looking for work as a baby-sitter? Never heard of it.

And the site advertising “Strip Poker and Blackjack with Amberleigh West?”

Nope.

Or those Russian sites?

Says West about others appropriating her image, “It happens. It comes with the industry.”

West plans to frame the entire Playboy in which she appears. Years from now, she wants to remember. She was part of the changing of the girl next door.

“It’s so amazing to be part of something like this,” she says.

Those elusive males ages 25 to 30.

Come on, laddies, what do you really, really, want? Content publishers everywhere pray for the secret.