Surfacing as a Scottish tradition as early as the 10th century, tartan was temporarily banned eight centuries later, always a surefire way...

Share story

Surfacing as a Scottish tradition as early as the 10th century, tartan was temporarily banned eight centuries later, always a surefire way to ignite a trend. Mad plaid has once again captured the attention of another clannish crowd — the fashion faction.

The print steps out in new forms, just in time for the season when folks are compelled to don that festive, though highly unfashionable, combination: red and green.

Eschewing school uniform cuts in favor of Ivy’s strapless dress, Bottega Veneta’s four-inch stilettos or Alexis Bittar’s studded acrylic bangles can yield a decidedly racy treatment of Christmas’s signature colors.

If you’re a purist, or simply taking genealogy to another level, you can find your own family plaid at the Scottish Tartans Museum in Franklin, N.C. (www.scottishtartans.org). If that’s too much work, just grab that bouclé clutch and dream of becoming Kate Spade’s extended family member.